News

Looking Back Nov. 21

A trip through the Sooke News Mirror archives:

 

Nov. 20, 1985

Continued break-ins concern to RCMP

Continuing break and enters in the Sooke area, plus the theft of items form vehicles, including tools, gas and batteries, have Sooke RCMP concerned. Police are asking for public information that may help them solve the crimes and apprehend the criminals, says RCMP Corporal Wendal Milne.

“Persons should not be reluctant to phone us if they notice anything unusual, no matter what the time of day. They do not need to leave their names or other identifying information.” Kaltasin Road, Maple Avenue and Grant Road are the areas hardest hit by the thefts of gasoline and other articles.

Police say they need citizens to phone if they feel something is amiss, particularly in these areas of Sooke.

A barking dog can be an indication that there is a possible problem. Corp. Milne said in a recent incident that a citizen later told RCMP that he had heard his dog barking frantically on the same night that several thefts had occurred in the area.

Nov. 17, 1993

Voter apathy prevalent in days leading up to civic election

If the all-candidates meetings are any indication, Sooke isn’t too concerned about Saturday’s municipal election.

While 50 people showed up at Monday’s Sooke all-candidates forum for regional director, a disappointing crowd of a couple dozen came for a similar function in Otter Point last Wednesday.

Former Mirror editor John Arnett, who covered the last four local elections, said voter turnout has never been too high for any of them, and his one looks bleaker than most.

Nov. 22, 1995

Aging arena needs $500,000 facelift

The Sooke Arena is going to need almost $500,000 in upgrades over the next five years, the Sooke Electoral Area Parks and Recreation Commission manager reported.

Larry Hutchings has compiled a lengthy list of items at the arena that have reached, or are nearing, their 20 year expectancy.

And as if to make a point, work crews spent Friday repairing leaking condensing coils for the ice-making equipment.

“We had to shut down the plant Friday and we never got it on until 8 p.m. There were no floods and we had the lights down low. It was nip and tuck,” Hutchings said.

He added that repairs are temporary and $22,000 worth of replacement coils are on order. They could take up to eight weeks for delivery.

“Hopefully the repairs will last until then.” But the urgent repairs are just the tip of the iceberg.

Among the other 20 items slated for replacement over five years are the arena’s zamboni at $80,000, the arena roof at $50,000, the rink boards at another $50,000, two ice-making compressors at $22,000 each, a hot water tank at $10,000 and oil tank separators at $6,000.

Nov. 22, 2006

 

Culinary arts students showcase talents

A buffet demonstrating the prowess of culinary students at Edward Milne community school is about to be presented for diners who know a good deal when they taste it.

This annual event is eagerly awaited and not just by relatives of the students. Under the experience, professional guidance of Sheila Hunter and Pia Carroll, the students in the EMCS culinary program are well on their way to fulfilling careers in the kitchen.

Pia Carroll, whose resume includes many years of service in high-end dining establishments, described some of what diners can expect when common areas at EMCS are transformed into a fine restaurant.

“It’s a wonderful showcase for our students... for their families.. for the local people in Sooke to come and enjoy an incredible buffet. We use decorations as much as we can to make it look really nice.”

We encourage an open exchange of ideas on this story's topic, but we ask you to follow our guidelines for respecting community standards. Personal attacks, inappropriate language, and off-topic comments may be removed, and comment privileges revoked, per our Terms of Use. Please see our FAQ if you have questions or concerns about using Facebook to comment.

Community Events, April 2014

Add an Event

Read the latest eEdition

Browse the print edition page by page, including stories and ads.

Apr 16 edition online now. Browse the archives.