Looking Back, Sept 25, 2013

A look back through the years at some of the events that made the news in Sooke

  • Wed Sep 25th, 2013 8:00pm
  • News

A look back at some of the events that shaped the life of Sooke.

 

September 26, 2012

EDC abolished

Mayor Wendal Milne proposed to disband the Economic Development Commission in favour of three mayor advisory panels at the last EDC meeting on Sept. 19.

“It’s a matter of time to create an environment where people can think tank without bureaucratic restric- tions on them,” Milne said.

He said over the summer, discussions with EDC members and councillors have found the current EDC model did not bring results.

“We’ve got two or three groups of people that have different interests in what they’re trying to accomplish and you put them all at the same table and potentially it allows the spinning of the wheels.

“By putting everybody together a lot of people felt it was too cumbersome, too unwieldy. A lot of their evenings were going over minutes, debating and discussing and they weren’t really able to brainstorm an issue.”

September 24, 2008

Twice weekly breakfast program

Monday and Wednesday mornings from 7:30 to 9:30 — breakfast will be served to those who would not otherwise be able to start the day with a nutritious meal.

The Sooke Baptist Church at 7110 West Coast Road is the location of the complementary effort which began on September 22, and hosted by the local lay counselling program.

September 24, 2003

John Muir elementary school Grade 2 student Ashleigh Epps said cleaning up Ella Beach as like a “treasure hunt.”

Amongst the pop cans and Styrofoam, the seven-year-old discovered a crab claw she was eager to bring home, found on the rocky swath of shoreline at the end of Ella Road.

The Great Canadian Shoreline Cleanup is part of the International Coastal Cleans, which in the past 17 years has seen more than 4.5 million volunteers from 120 countries scour shorelines and waterways.

September 23, 1988

Sooke students’ anti-violence initiatives subject of Knowledge Network program

Violence and intolerance prevention programs at two Sooke schools will be highlighted as part of two television programs that explore issues of B.C. public schools that are of concern to the public.

Film crews were on hand at Journey middle school and Sooke elementary school last week to film students in action, and interview staff and parents.

According to a ministry of education fact sheet, the television program was chosen because it allows vital information to be conveyed to a large audience at a reasonable cost.

September 22, 1993

Students back on board buses

Grant Road and Broome Hill public school children forced to walk to school last week because of overcrowded buses should have been back on board yesterday morning.

Sooke School District transportation supervisor John Walker has managed to make room for about 45 additional children by juggling routes and pulling a stand-by bus into regular service.

Walker said there were similar troubles with overcrowding in the Colwood area sparked by rapid growth. He said he hoped the province’s annual funding review can provide a long-term solution.