COLUMN: Who drives your bus?

Taking note of people, really noticing, is an attribute we can all learn from

I live in East Sooke so transit can be frustrating, or something to take note of.

I ride the East Sooke No. 64 most days. And, frankly, I like who drives the bus.

He is wonderful. I make this judgment after riding his bus for only 40 minutes, and I witnessed something that I think is worth noting.

He knows people.

He knows about couples that walk along his route, about the elderly man who likes to garden, he knows about the lady on his route that kayaks to work most days, and when it rains, what stop to stop at, and look for her. He always watches for the elderly lady with the equally elderly golden lab, and he would slow down through that stretch of road. He waved at each one, and each one looked for and waved back when they saw it was him driving.

He listens, watches, and pays attention to others; in the smallest amounts of time – in a drive by, or a quick conversation. Hmm … do I do that?

Simply, he takes note of others. I make up that for him to know and take in so much about each person he encounters, he must stay in the moment, with each person he meets.

At the end of the line which was my stop, was the jewel in the crown of this King of Notice. A curly haired blond boy, waving and jumping up and down at the stop because, he saw him.

I realized after witnessing him, the quality he had, and employed. I decided to employ this skill too. I decided to take note because he took note.

And wonder-fullness came my way.

I got to thinking and tried out a thought. The thought went like this: If from someone I see a quality I wish I had more of – what would happen if I practiced this quality I was quietly learning from?

The strangest thing happened – conversations were less trivial, friendships deepened.

I’ll give you an example.

There was this older than me lassie, who was an amazing listener; so I employed the precious skill she had. I listened.

My thoughts waited until her words were done. We shared back and forth – it was one of the best conversations where I had actually heard the most – and I felt heard like never before.

Back to my bus driver.

May I ride in your realm a bit more King Dave? I want to stay in this realm more because I see the power of taking note; of fully being with another, even, if for a moment.

Fully being with others is a skill I want to practice and hone that and your steed is more reliable than mine. You to me are the king of taking notice. Thank you, Dave.

Was it transit or transition?

I’m in favour of both.

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Dawn Humphreys is an East Sooke resident and author of the upcoming book Straight Talk from a Zig Zag Girl.