Jordan River was vibrant

Safe to assume that I speak for all the people who attended Jordan River Elementary School, bought groceries at the JR store, performed in the Christmas concerts, danced and played floor hockey at the JR community hall and of course, hoisted a pint at the JR hotel that the idea that there might be a glimmer of hope of the old home town being resurrected is one that warms the heart a little.

Yes, the notion that one might actually be able to buy a piece of the formerly Crown land where we spent our youth, so that we might someday be able to return home is indeed a happy one. And my suspicion is that the majority of the self-proclaimed “urban elitists,” despite all their whining and fear mongering about the total destruction that any development of this pristine wilderness sanctuary will inevitably cause are largely unaware that Jordan River was once a vibrant community.

Because you see, Victoria really only began to discover JR about 20 years ago and for your benefit, I can assure you that it was a great place to live, work and play long before it was a nice place to go hiking or surfing on weekends.

Of course, guests were welcome. In the ‘70s, JR had a population of around 300 and we didn’t need your urban elitist definition of what our rural lifestyle ought to consist of.

Thanks, anyway. Now, what have I done with my banjo?

Dana Lajeunesse

Sooke