Letters to the editor – Jan. 6

Weekly letters to the editor from within the Sooke community.

Wishful thinking on climate change

Re: Global lukewarming to the skeptical eye (Opinion, Dec. 23)

Like Rick Stiebel , I too wish that global warming were a myth. But unfortunately it isn’t, and his article just seems like wishful thinking to me.

More than 90 percent of climate scientists believe that climate change is happening, and that it is largely caused by human activity. World governments would not be promising to spend so much money on the problem if the facts were not staring them in the face.

Air and ocean temperatures are high, polar ice caps are definitely melting, and sea-level rise has begun to threaten low-lying tropical islands.

An overall temperature rise of two degrees Celsius is probably already inevitable, but if we don’t find ways to reduce our emission of greenhouse gases, temperatures may rise so high that coastal cities are flooded and soils are changed to the point that we won’t be able to grow enough food to feed ourselves.

Talking about government as companies’ “co-conspirators” is really a self-defeating way of thinking. Of course companies will try to make as much profit as possible. I can’t blame them. But government is our only tool for keeping them from going too far.

If we don’t like our government, it is our job to help nominate and elect a government that will really work for us rather than for private interests. And then we have to work with our governments to make sure they continue to serve our real long-term interests — not just for our own convenience today, but for our descendants for decades to come.

The word “skeptical” sounds so smart, but climate-change denial is really just wishful thinking, hoping without real evidence that the whole problem is a figment of someone’s imagination. I wish it were, but the evidence keeps growing, and if we humans don’t start doing something now, our descendants will suffer enormous consequences.

Greg Whincup

Sooke

 

More work needed on crosswalks

Wow! We now have a million-dollar roundabout. Now all we need is an improvement on crosswalks and proper lighting on sidewalks. It is no easy task on any corner in town for pedestrians, even at the lights (if cars stop for you).

Bill Jones

Sooke

 

Food Bank organizers earn special bouquet

Hats off and big bows to the Sooke Food Bank organizers.

I had the privilege of spending a few hours on Dec. 18 to help sort the produces that came in for the Christmas hampers.

I was overwhelmed by the volume of details and organized skills of the leaders who do so much for the people in need. They are a class act and I hope I will be able to help in the future.

I wish everyone in Sooke could see what goes on there and at some time be able to help.

Judithe Ann Gatto

Sooke

 

Tolls could be answer to Sooke Rd. traffic woes

Re: Major roadwork (News, Dec. 16)

Your statistics on the number of people who live in the Sooke area but work on the other end of Sooke Road illustrate that costs need to be all-in for sound decision-making.

Without a cost for use of the road, people are more inclined to split work and home locations to get lower cost housing.

Demand for roads, and shifting of traffic patterns, was shown decades ago across the Fraser River, south of Vancouver.

When the Alex Fraser

Bridge was opened the Transportation Ministry cautioned people that it was not the solution for all time – they forecast the bridge would be operating at capacity in 10 years, but it was only two years later. People shifted routes and more moved to the distant suburbs.

Perhaps a bypass to Sooke Road could be funded by tolls. The price of use for each individual would be quickly paid back by saving of their one scarce resource – time alive, less risk to their health, and fewer job problems from being late for work when Sooke Road is closed by an accident yet again.

Keith Sketchley

Saanich