Letters to the Editor

Letters: Pesticides kill more than pests

Open letter To: Mr. Ted Menzies, president of Croplife Canada (a lobby group representing the agricultural biotechnology industry) and Russell Hurst, executive director, sustainability and stewardship of Croplife.

 

 

Sirs,

What does it take for you and your lobby group to admit that neonicotinoid pesticides kill not only bees but many insects and birds critical to the natural chain of life. They are also being linked to human health hazards.  Any decent person, government, company, or corporation would immediately stop the use of such poisons when they are scientifically linked to such huge environmental problems as these have been. But, I guess that’s the big difference between a decent person and a lobby group who’s sole purpose is to promote the interests of corporations such a Monsanto, BASF, Bayer CropScience, Dow AgroSciences, DuPont, FMC Corp., Sumitomo and Syngenta.

Health Canada’s Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) -- bowing to pressure from lobby group Croplife and the pesticide industry -- shockingly punted any action on the bee-killing pesticides until at least 2016.

The European community put a ban of these poisons last year once the true science was out, but I suppose since the Harper regime doesn’t want science to be part of any policy setting in Canada and since you Ted, are a former Alberta Conservative MP it is no wonder Croplife wants to wait two more years before doing anything.

This marriage of former government heads (MP’s, Senate and Congress members etc..)., who turn to the so-called “public sector” jobs always seems to be a marriage made in Heaven. To me the conflict of interest here is as obvious as the nose on my face.  The biotech seed and food manufacturer’s have an obvious mission to control and reap the profits of supplying the world’s foods. As with most such corporations they are not satisfied until they have a total strangle-hold on all aspects of that business.

Now, since the lines between corporate interest and elected governments (which are supposed to be for and by the people) have become very blurred, it is not hard for a common citizen like me to assume that business and consumerism is guiding all policy making while science, and common sense are being not only ignored but actively dismantled. This realization has a terrible impact on the morale and life of all citizens who see more to life than money, consumerism and economy.  There is such a thing as “human” and “societal” economy which incorporates many aspects of life and the planet than just those associated with money.

How many times have we heard and seen first hand that many of those with loads of money are not happy? To feel good as a human being takes alot more than just a thick wallet. In fact, I would argue that how you made that money, has much more to do with how you feel as a person.

Do the right thing, admit that wrong is wrong, and allow a moratorium on neonicotinoid’s  in Canada.

You may not get richer... but you’ll feel better... and so will the bees, insects and birds.

Tom Eberhardt

Sooke

 

 

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