Offensive to question motives

Pirjo Raits, who dislikes American involvement in Canadian activities despite their tourist dollars, raises two questions.

First: Who controls our lands? Answer:  “The owners” – in this case three numbered companies in which the number of American investors is irrelevant.  The owners, wherever they come from, are subject to democratically established laws concerning the impact of their decisions on society.  That’s why zoning laws and a Regional Growth Strategy exist.

This proposed mammoth resort of 266 buildings in the Rural Resource Lands alongside 16 km of the Juan de Fuca Trail is illegal under current zoning and forbidden under the CRD Growth Strategy.

This states that the Rural Resource Lands are reserved for agriculture, forestry and silviculture. The interests of the editorial writer are equally protected from unlawful activities by her neighbours that would affect her enjoyment of life.

I strongly support this kind of protection for Ms. Raits, as well as her right to organize resistance to anything she disagrees with, despite her considering such action reprehensible.

 

Question Two: What right has a U.S.-funded organization to interfere?

The Dogwood Initiative is a Canadian Registered Organization that receives donations from thousands of Canadians, many of whom are worried about the negative impact of this development. Receiving U.S. funds for action on the central coast is seen as a plus, but it certainly does not influence their concerns in this area. They see this as an excellent vehicle for expressing those concerns, however boisterously.  It’s offensive to question their motives.

John Hasell

Victoria