Energy and Mines Minister Bill Bennett (right) visits ironworkers at Red Chris Mine in northwestern B.C. The northwest transmission line is to be completed this year

B.C. still attractive to miners, minister says

Prosperity mine rejection not being held against province, but land claim uncertainty still a shadow over investment for B.C.

Industry representatives from around the world are disappointed in the latest rejected mine in B.C., but they’re not taking it out on the provincial government, Energy and Mines Minister Bill Bennett says.

Bennett started his week in Toronto at the Prospectors and Development Association convention, pitching B.C.’s efforts to make B.C. more attractive to mining investment. He said delegates were disappointed to hear that Taseko Mines’ proposal to develop a copper-gold deposit near Williams Lake.

“People don’t associate that decision with the B.C. government, they associate it with the federal government, and I think people here are more optimistic than I expected,” Bennett said in a phone interview from Toronto.

With 30,000 delegates, the convention is the largest industry gathering in the world. Bennett promoted the construction of the Northwest Transmission Line, bringing electricity to the remote region north of Terrace. To be completed this summer, the line will enable operation of the Red Chris copper-gold mine near Iskut.

Of the 20 major mine proposals currently in the B.C. environmental assessment process, five are in the northwest.

Bennett said one of the main difficulties for junior mining companies is attracting financing for projects that take many years to develop and produce returns.

The annual Fraser Institute global survey of mining companies was released at the convention. Alberta was viewed as the most attractive jurisdiction in Canada for mining, and third in the world, based on taxation, legal system and certainty around land claims.

B.C.’s ranking in the survey went from 31st to 32nd in the world, a measure of its aboriginal relations climate.

Gavin Dirom, president of the Association for Mineral Exploration B.C., said the province has improved in the ranking over the past five years, along with Alberta and Nunavut.

 

Just Posted

First council candidate is missing

RCMP asks that anyone with information contact them immediately

Junior A hockey coming to Sooke

Exhibition game helps the Rotary Club to help community youth

Life-Altering experience

Six weeks that served to change their view of the world

Cross-examination begins for Oak Bay dad accused of killing daughters

Andrew Berry is charged in the deaths of six-year-old Chloe and four-year-old Aubrey in 2017

Arenas, fitness centre ready for action after significant flood at Saanich recreation centre

Library branch, archives remain closed after Thursday night flood

B.C. sockeye returns drop as official calls 2019 ‘extremely challenging’

Federal government says officials are seeing the same thing off Alaska and Washington state

Sooke’s Old-Fashioned Country Picnic set for Saturday

The free event combines music, kids activities, food and fun

Expanded support to help B.C. youth from care attend university still falling short

Inadequate support, limited awareness and eligibility restrictions some of the existing challenges

Ethnic media aim to help maintain boost in voting by new Canadians

Statistics Canada says new Canadians made up about one-fifth of the voting population in 2016

Dog attacked by river otters, Penticton owner says

Marie Fletcher says her dog was pulled underwater by four river otters in the Penticton Channel

Wife charged in husband’s death in Sechelt

Karin Fischer has been charged with second-degree murder in the death of her husband, Max

B.C. Hydro applies for rare cut in electricity rates next year

Province wrote off $1.1 billion debt to help reverse rate increase

Retired Vancouver Island teacher ‘Set for Life’ after $675K lottery win

Patrick Shannon plans to buy new sails for his sailboat

Most Read