Justice Minister Suzanne Anton expects the Civil Resolution Tribunal will result in faster strata property dispute resolution at lower cost

Condo dispute tribunal begins work

Early intake of strata property dispute resolution applications begins for Canada's first online tribunal

B.C.’s Civil Resolution Tribunal has begun taking “early intake” applications for strata property disputes.

Canada’s first online tribunal is not yet fully operational, and is testing its application process. The tribunal has 18 lawyers and mediation experts who will adjudicate strata property and small claims disputes without going to court.

Legislation to create the tribunal was passed in the spring of 2015. Justice Minister Suzanne Anton said at the time that the tribunal and its early resolution process “will help to resolve disputes faster and with more lasting outcomes, while saving people time and money.”

The tribunal is expecting a large spike of strata-related claims as it starts up, and warns that it could take several months to resolve claims as it continues to add staff and develop its technology.

The tribunal has a guide to its service on its website. The application begins with a “solutions explorer” where people describe the nature of their dispute and then receive detailed information about their options under B.C. law.

The first suggestion is to use form letters to contact the other party in the dispute directly, to see if it can be settled without a formal application to the tribunal.

[See video introduction below.]

Most strata claims have a two-year limitation period, after which they can’t be taken to the tribunal or to court. If an early intake application is accepted, it may stop the countdown and allow the case to be prepared for when tribunal members begin hearing cases.

If applicants are accepted and then change their minds and want to go to court instead, approval of the tribunal is required.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

The long road to recovery will have a few bumps

Some things will never be the same after the COVID-19 pandemic, local experts say

Peninsula farm stands open for business with COVID-19 restrictions

Growers hopeful shoppers will support local farms

Income tax deadline looming

2019 individual tax returns are due June 1, June 15 for self-employed individuals

Langford’s City Centre Park cautiously reopens most activities as of Friday

Ice rink, bowling alley and restaurant to follow new regulations

Sooke council approves new funding for chamber of commerce

A $16,000 service agreement to be created

B.C. legislature coming back June 22 as COVID-19 emergency hits record

Pandemic restrictions now longer than 2017 wildfire emergency

Facing changes together: Your community, your journalists

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the world in ways that would have… Continue reading

B.C.’s essential grocery, hardware store employees should get pandemic pay: retail group

Only B.C.’s social, health and corrections workers are eligible for top-ups

COLUMN: Canada needs to remember rural communities as thoughts turn to pandemic recovery

Small towns often rely on tourism, which has been decimated by COVID-19

Edmonton, Vancouver and Toronto vying to be NHL hubs, but there’s a catch

The NHL unveiled a return-to-play plan that would feature 24 teams

As SD84 schools look to reopen, Kyuquot and Zeballos opt out

Schools in Tahsis and Gold River will open on June 1, with 30 per cent students expected to come in

B.C. sees 9 new COVID-19 cases, one death as officials watch for new cases amid Phase Two

Number of confirmed active cases is at 244, with 37 people in hospital

POLL: Do you agree with the provincial government’s decision to increase the minimum wage?

B.C.’s lowest-paid workers will be getting a few more dollars to try… Continue reading

Illicit-drug deaths up in B.C. and remain highest in Canada: chief coroner

More than 4,700 people have died of overdoses since B.C. declared a public health emergency in early 2016

Most Read