More than 600 people participated in last years CIBC Run for the Cure. (Black Press File Photo)

CIBC Run for the Cure returns to Victoria

Victorians set to join Canadians from across the country in the fight against cancer

On Sunday Oct. 8, hundreds of Victorians will participate in the 28th annual Canadian Cancer Society CIBC Run for the Cure.

This year’s event is also taking place in 56 other locations around the country and is the largest single-day, volunteer-led event aimed at raising funds for breast cancer research.

One of the participants in this year’s Victoria run is Rachel Staples. In May 2016, Staples and her sister were both diagnosed with breast cancer within a week of each other.

Now Rachel will be joining the ongoing fundraising efforts that helped her and her sister in their fight against cancer.

ALSO READ:Centre gives breast cancer patients new outlook on life

The event has grown a lot since its first iteration that took place in Toronto’s High Park back in 1992, when a group of volunteers came together and raised $85,000. What was once a relatively small event now takes place from coast to coast. Last year alone they raised $16 million, and in total the Run for the Cure has raised $445 million.

The Canadian Cancer Society uses the money raised for breast cancer research, support services, health education and advocacy programs. Over the past 20 years, the Canadian Cancer Society has invested over $360 million in breast cancer research and funded more than 1,400 scientific and community grants.

Andrea Seale, Interim CEO at the Canadian Cancer Society spoke about the ongoing need for this event.

“We’ve certainly made huge strides in breast cancer, but every day more than 70 Canadians will receive a diagnoses,” Seale said.

“We must keep investing in the breast cancer cause so more people can continue to survive their diagnoses and enjoy a better quality of life.”

ALSO READ: Federal Government invests $10 million towards cervical cancer research

Seale says that the participants in the event are what make it so special.

“Each year, the CIBC Run for the Cure unites a collective of Canadians who are a force-for-life in the face of breast cancer,”

Victoria’s run begins at 9 a.m. at the University of Victoria, registration is now open online.

You can find more information and register for the Victoria run at convio.cancer.ca

vnc.editorial@blackpress.ca

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