Workshop participants learned how to handle an electric fence.

Electric fencing information found at workshop

Fences built to prevent human and wildlife conflicts

It was a busy morning at the Sooke Region Museum on Friday Sept 19.

Debbie Read, the community coordinator for WildSafeBC, hosted an Electric Fence Workshop outside the museum.

Frank Ritcey, the Provincial Coordinator for WildSafe BC, educated the class of 30 how to build a complete Electric Fencing system.

People attended from all over the CRD region, wanting to learn how to prevent conflict with wild animals such as bears, cougars and deer. Many in attendance have experienced problems with wildlife and wanted to learn how to minimize human-wildlife conflict.  They all commented, “we learned a lot here today!”

Whether it is the chickens we keep in the backyard, fruit trees, bees or livestock, we have a responsibility to manage them in such a manner that it is sustainable and has minimal impact on the wildlife that shares the landscape with us.

WildSafeBC strives to learn and to share about how we can reduce human-wildlife conflicts in all of our day-to-day activities. This electric fence workshop will help people in our community. The electric fence is a sure way to discourage wildlife said Read.

Those who attended understood that removing the wildlife is a short-term solution. Other wildlife will take the place of the wildlife just removed. A longer-term solution is to either manage the attractant or set up a barrier between the attractant and the wildlife. Preventing these conflicts makes our communities safer and more sustainable. The program strives to educate in order to prevent wildlife from lingering in our urban areas.

Debbie Read

Capital Regional District WildSafe BC Community Coordinator

Just Posted

Province funds $88.6M for two new schools in Langford by 2022

Langford gets 500-seat elementary school and a 700-seat middle school

Green New Deal meeting in Sooke part of a larger movement

Humanity has 4,000 days left before it will be too late

Premier opens playground

New Playground at École Poirier. John Horgan joined School Division 62 officials… Continue reading

Fish closure in Port Renfrew has endangered more than 40 per cent of businesses

YouTube video challenges residents to remember when election comes around

Council pursues water line extension for north Sooke

Properties affected by Highway 14 project may see water service

Oak Bay mom describes finding son ‘gone’ on first day of coroners inquest into overdose death

Jury to make recommendations based on death of Elliot Eurchuk, 16

Dash-cam video in trial of accused cop killer shows man with a gun

Footage is shown at trial of Oscar Arfmann, charged with killing Const. John Davidson of Abbotsford

Suicide confirmed in case of B.C. father who’d been missing for months

2018 disappearance sparked massive search for Ben Kilmer

Eight U.S. senators write to John Horgan over B.C. mining pollution

The dispute stems from Teck Resources’ coal mines in B.C.’s Elk Valley

Threats charge against Surrey’s Jaspal Atwal stayed

Atwal, 64, was at centre of controversy in 2018 over his attendance at prime minister’s reception in India

Anti-vaxxer Robert F. Kennedy Jr. to speak in Surrey

He’s keynote speaker at Surrey Environment and Business Awards luncheon by Surrey Board of Trade Sept. 17

Otters devour 150 trout at Kootenay hatchery

The hatchery has lost close to 150 fish in the past several months

EDITORIAL: Sooke council’s pot approach an opportunity lost

When the federal government tabled Bill 36 in September 2018, it threw… Continue reading

Green New Deal meeting in Sooke part of a larger movement

Humanity has 4,000 days left before it will be too late

Most Read