History: The “Bubbers” Jones

Sooke's historian Elida Peers writes about Jones' twins

Shy little guys, they may have seemed in this 1929 photo when they were four years old.

Identical twins Stan and Len Jones were called “the Bubbers” when they were kids. When they grew up, though, these twin brothers were anything but shy – they became community leaders.

The twins’ mother, Mabel Eve Jones would take them for walks to entertain them, and the Royal Canadian Legion’s cenotaph was handy, standing in the 1920s /30s on the corner of Murray and Sooke Roads. The boys’ dad, George Jones, was a businessman who was operating a motor stage carrying freight between Victoria, Sooke and points west.

When they were old enough, Stan and Len both enlisted in the Royal Canadian Navy and served overseas during World War II, as did their dad as well. Mabel Jones was left at home to care for the youngest, Gary, and contribute her time to working in the canteen at the Otter Point Army Training Camp.

Returning from the war, Stan went into logging at first, but his thoughts were on business. In 1966 Stan and his wife Marion bought Sooke’s main grocery business from Bob Gibson, at the Otter Point/Sooke Road corner.

The twins had married sisters from Alberta. Brother Len, married to Dorene, went into the forest industry as well, and eventually established a log booming business. His company was contracted to carry out the booming for Sooke Forest Products Sawmill on Goodridge Peninsula.

In 1974 the twins teamed up to establish Sooke’s first shopping mall, Cedar Grove Shopping Centre. While successful at business, the brothers’ first love remained the community itself.  Stan Jones devoted half a century of work to developing the Sooke Community Association’s assets.

Len Jones spent many years with the Sooke Volunteer Fire Department, served as elected School Trustee for District 62 for seven years, and also devoted decades to the Sooke Community Association. The “Bubbers” never stopped. Following their parents’ early example, brothers Stan and Len shared their hearts with the people of Sooke and their legacy is carried on by the younger generations.

Should anyone be wondering why the cenotaph in the photo was fenced, Sooke had no pound law at that time, and cattle roamed freely about the village.

Elida Peers,

Historian

Sooke Region Museum

 

 

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

TRAFFIC: Saanich emergency crews responding to Pat Bay Highway collision

Incident took place at Haliburton Road intersection

Saanich race car driver shifts gears as pandemic cuts U.S. season short

Bill Okell, 65, sets sights on Canadian racing circuit for 2020

Chorus expands online options to in-person rehearsal in Langford, Oak Bay

Free, non-auditioned SingYourJoy recruits those aged 16 to 29

Work on Sidney’s Reay Creek Dam won’t wrap until 2021

Municipality expects the pond to be ‘partially drained’ again in 2021

B.C. records 98 more COVID-19 cases, most in Lower Mainland

One new senior home outbreak, Surrey Memorial outbreak over

Vancouver Island Tour de Rock riders roll into Parksville Qualicum Beach

Saturday’s schedule includes Port Alberni, Ucluelet and Tofino, followed by Nanaimo on Sunday

97 distressed horses, cats and dogs seized from farm in Princeton

RCMP assisted as BC SPCA executed search warrant

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

$250K reward offered as investigation continues into Sea to Sky Gondola vandalism

Police also asking for specific footage of Sea to Sky highway around time of incident

Trudeau ‘disappointed’ by RCMP treatment of Sikh officers over mask issue

World Sikh Organization of Canada said taking Sikh officers off the front lines constitutes discrimination

Liberals reach deal with NDP on COVID-19 aid bill, likely averting election

NDP and the Liberals have reached an agreement on COVID-19 sick-leave

Most Read