The Pimlott family expedition to Williams Creek 37 years ago.

SOOKE HISTORY: A woodsman and his daughters

Ray Pimlott spent his working life working in the woods around the Sooke region

One of the great things about being superintendent for Pacific Logging was that you could take your family out so they could experience seeing the forests in all circumstances, such as this newly logged area.

Ray Pimlott’s working life was almost entirely spent in the woods, and as a devoted family man, scenes such as this expedition to Williams Creek in December 1979 were part of the fabric of his and Glenda’s life.

The Douglas-fir pictured, 12 feet in diameter at the butt, felled and yarded using chokers on a 120 Skagit tower and loaded using an America line loader onto an off highway logging truck, was hauled out via Butler Main and unloaded at the Pacific Logging dryland sort before being put into the water at Butler Brothers booming grounds on West Coast Road.

Perched top left is son-in-law Jim Diebold with his kids David and Denise, another son-in-law Bill Jessiman, and Ray Pimlott standing on a jagged edge of the cut. On the forest floor below are Deanna Pimlott Jessiman, Karen Pimlott Diebold, Stephen Davies with his wife Christina Pimlott, and at right, Kathy Govenlock whose husband Alden took the photo. Linda Pimlott (later Redlick) is kneeling in front.

Ray Pimlott, while born in Victoria, came to Sooke as a youngster with his parents and elder brother. His dad George had started his forest career polecutting with horses in the Great Depression, moving on to Port Renfrew where he pioneered in truck logging.

Moving his family to a tree-shaded home in the centre of Sooke in 1937, George worked as a contract trucker for the forest industry, so it was small wonder that son Ray started his working career driving truck as well.  He moved on to become a loading operator for Butler Brothers Logging and then woods foreman; meanwhile he and his wife Glenda raised their five daughters pictured above.

Ray became superintendent for Butlers, then for its successor, Pacific Logging, their work taking them from the Sooke and Leech Rivers westward.

With changes in management in the mid-1980s, Ray and Glenda had to leave Sooke and move up-island where he continued to work in the industry until his retirement.

After putting in almost half a century in the woods, Wally Butler presented Ray with the massive Butler Bull-Block, weighing over a ton and probably the largest in the world (historically used with steel cables in “high lead” logging) and proud as he was of this treasure, Ray donated it to the Sooke Region Museum, where it can be viewed at the Phillips Road frontage today.

•••

Elida Peers is the historian of the Sooke Region Museum.

 

 

Just Posted

Port Renfrew man charged with animal cruelty

Hot coffee poured on dog’s face, say police

Sooke cougar sighting unconfirmed

Boy had a close encounter with the big cat

Central Saanich makes moves to alieviate business transit concerns

Councillor calls for enhanced service and long-term transit passes

Garbage piles up at Mount Doug Park in Saanich

Local resident blames the design of the garbage bins

VIDEO: B.C. MLA Michelle Stilwell takes first steps in nearly 30 years

‘It actually felt like walking. It’s been 27 years… but it felt realistic to me’

Report of dead body in B.C. park actually headless sex doll

This discovery, made at Manning Park on July 10, led police to uncovering two other sex mannequins

Grand Forks fire chief found to have bullied, harassed volunteer firefighter: report

WorkSafeBC, third-party human resources investigation looking into allegations complete

Taekwondo instructor, 21, identified as B.C. bat rabies victim

Nick Major, 21, an instructor at Cascadia Martial Arts in Parksville

15-year-old with imitation gun caused ‘dynamic’ scene at Nanaimo mall

No one was harmed in Monday’s incident, say Nanaimo RCMP

B.C. on right road with tougher ride-hailing driver rules, says expert

The provincial government is holding firm that ride-hailing drivers have a Class 4 licence

RCMP investigating alleged ‘sexual misconduct’ by cyclist on BCIT campus

BCIT said they were reviewing video evidence of the incident

New home cost dips in B.C.’s large urban centres

Victoria, Kelowna, Vancouver prices decline from last year

Graphic suicide scene edited out of ‘13 Reasons Why’ finale

Suicide prevention groups support the decision

Most Read