Kate Barton and her son inspect the book bin at SEAPARC to find the perfect book for a morning read. (Tim Collins/Sooke News Mirror)                                (Contributed)

Kate Barton and her son inspect the book bin at SEAPARC to find the perfect book for a morning read. (Tim Collins/Sooke News Mirror) (Contributed)

Sooke Literacy programs a STEAMY affair

Literacy transcends just learning to read

Literacy is a form of empowerment, but literacy has transcended the concept of simply teaching people to read and write.

The concept of literacy has expanded to encompass a host of skills that together are a pathway to fulfilling each person’s full potential, said Kate Barton, the Sooke Region Literacy coordinator

“Of course, we are still concerned with teaching basic literacy. That’s still an important part of our mandate,” said Barton. “But we also address issues such as emotional and physical literacy and are concerned with concepts such as family literacy.”

RELATED: Sooke Literacy a great resource

Barton said Decoda, the parent organization that funds the Sooke Literacy Project, believes in pooling its resources with other groups to improve the resources available to the community.

“Decoda’s jumping off point is reading, but they recognize that there are a number of facets to literacy and we don’t limit ourselves to a single interpretation of the concept.”

One of the areas that Barton’s group is exploring involves STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics) literacy.

To that end, they will host Sooke’s Family Literacy Day on Jan. 27 with a theme of “Make It!”

They’ve partnered with Engineering for Kids Vancouver Island to provide hands-on learning workshops for three different age ranges.

Children, ages three to six, are invited to have fun with O0bleck (that’s a non-newtonian green gooey substance) and the seven to 10 year olds will have the opportunity to explore the hardware engineering workshop. The older children (11-14) will have the opportunity to learn about 3D printing in the master engineer program.

Sooke Literacy also manages both adult and children’s book bins at SEAPARC, Sooke Family Resource Society, the T’Souke Nation and in the entrance of Edward Milne community school.

“We also run programs like Books for Breakfast where we gather with children and their parents to have a healthy snack and read a book. The neat part is that the children then get to take the book home with them,” said Barton.

Registration information for that program is available at sookeliteracy@gmail.com.

Literacy is a significant concern in B.C. with an estimated 700,000 people reported to have challenges with basic skills like understanding newspapers, instruction manuals, or reading health information.

Mathematical literacy poses challenges with personal finances and even basic tasks like calculating medicine dosages.

“Our goal is to improve literacy in the widest interpretation of that term, including financial, arithmetic, emotional and physical literacy. They are related and go along with the classical interpretation of literacy,” said Barton.

Information regarding Sooke Literacy can be had by contacting them via Facebook or Instagram @sookeliteracy or by contacting the EMCS Society at 250 642 6371 for upcoming event dates and ongoing activities.



mailto:tim.collins@sookenewsmirror.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Coaches with the Juan de Fuca Minor Hockey association have had to get creative during their weekly practices to keep players interested and improving their skills without physical contact. (Damian Kowalewich photo)
West Shore minor hockey coach shares what it’s like on the ice without parents, fans

Most practices consist of relay races, goalie shots and passing drills

The Songhees Wellness Centre is a symbol of First Nations strength in the region. Representatives of local First Nations will soon play a greater role in decision making and governance relating to the Capital Regional District. (Courtesy Royal Roads University)
Capital Regional District to add First Nations representatives to advisory committees

Board approves bylaw, looks forward to Indigenous input on future decisions

Central Saanich will investigate ways in which the municipality along with funding partners Sidney and North Saanich can financially support the Panorama Recreation Centre. (Black Press Media File)
Central Saanich to spell out options for financially supporting Panorama Recreation Centre

Municipality looks for best use of COVID-19 restart grant worth some $3.5 million

Willow, a kitten belonging to a Victoria family, was rescued by firefighters on Thursday after she got stuck in a basement drain pipe. (City of Victoria/Twitter)
Victoria kitten stuck in basement drain pipe rescued by firefighters

Willow the cat on the mend, owner feeling ‘enormous gratitude’

(Black Press Media file photo)
Blue-green algae bloom confirmed in Elk Lake, water-based activities not recommended

Blue-green algae can be lethal to dogs, cause health issues for humans

Justin Kripps of Summerland and his team have competed in Olympic action and World Cup competitions in bobsleigh. (Jason Ransom-Canadian Olympic Comittee).
QUIZ: Are you ready for some winter sports?

It’s cold outside, but there are plenty of recreation opportunities in the winter months

(Phil McLachlan - Capital News)
‘Targeted’ shooting in Coquitlam leaves woman in hospital

The woman suffered non-life threatening injuries in what police believe to be a targeted shooting Saturday morning

JaHyung Lee, “Canada’s oldest senior” at 110 years old, received his first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine on Thursday, Jan. 14, 2021. He lives at Amenida Seniors Community in Newton. (Submitted photo: Amenida Seniors Community)
A unique-looking deer has been visiting a Nanoose Bay property with its mother. (Frieda Van der Ree photo)
A deer with 3 ears? Unique animal routinely visits B.C. property

Experts say interesting look may be result of an injury rather than an odd birth defect

Terry David Mulligan. (Submitted photo)
Podcast: Interview with longtime actor/broadcaster and B.C. resident Terry David Mulligan

Podcast: Talk includes TDM’s RCMP career, radio, TV, wine, Janis Joplin and much more

Seasonal influenza vaccine is administered starting each fall in B.C. and around the world. (Langley Advance Times)
After 30,000 tests, influenza virtually nowhere to be found in B.C.

COVID-19 precautions have eliminated seasonal infection

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau listens to a question during a news conference outside Rideau cottage in Ottawa, Friday, January 8, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Trudeau says Canada’s COVID vaccine plan on track despite Pfizer cutting back deliveries

Canadian officials say country will still likely receive four million doses by the end of March

Jobs Minister Ravi Kahlon shared a handwritten note his son received on Jan. 13, 2021. (Ravi Kahlon/Twitter)
Proud dad moment: B.C. minister’s son, 10, receives handwritten note for act of kindness

North Delta MLA took to Twitter to share a letter his son received from a new kid at school

Lilly and Poppy, two cats owned by Kalmar Cat Hotel ownder Donna Goodenough, both have cerebellAr hypoplasia, a genetic neurological condition that affects their ability to control their muscles and bones. Photo by Alistair Taylor – Campbell River Mirror
VIDEO: Wobbly Cats a riot of flailing legs and paws but bundles of love and joy to their owner

Woman urges others to not fear adopting cats with disabilities

Most Read