West Coast Refill, along with seven other Victoria businesses, raised more than $15,000 for the Vancouver Island Surfrider Chapter in a “Blue Friday” campaign, an sustainable alternative to Black Friday. (Facebook/Surfrider Foundation Vancouver Island)

West Coast Refill, along with seven other Victoria businesses, raised more than $15,000 for the Vancouver Island Surfrider Chapter in a “Blue Friday” campaign, an sustainable alternative to Black Friday. (Facebook/Surfrider Foundation Vancouver Island)

Victoria businesses raise more than $15,000 on sustainable ‘Black Friday alternative’

Businesses embrace ‘Blue Friday’ to raise money for Surfrider Foundation

Eight Victoria businesses embraced an alternative to Black Friday consumerism last month, taking part in a “Blue Friday” campaign and raised more than $15,000 for the Vancouver Island Surfrider Chapter, an activism network for the protection and conservation of the ocean.

On Nov. 29, L/L Supply, Ecologyst, Goldilocks, SALT, Zero Waste Emporium, West Coast Refill, Nootka & Sea, and Wychbury Ave donated all profits for “Blue Friday,” a sustainable Black Friday alternative.

The local companies chose to donate their profits to the Rise Above Plastics campaign, which focuses on long-term strategies for eliminating the impacts of plastics by “raising awareness about the dangers of plastics pollution, advocating for a reduction of single-use plastics and the recycling of all plastics.”

READ ALSO: Victoria businesses band together to make Black Friday more sustainable

In total, the businesses raised $15,192.89.

“Holiday shopping has only just begun and these local brands and the Surfrider Foundation are urging you to continue thinking about the environmental, social, and waste costs associated with your purchases,” Surfrider said in a joint press release with other participating businesses. “Remember, as a consumer, every dollar you spend is a vote for change. You have the power this holiday shopping season so vote responsibly.”

The Vancouver Island Surfrider Chapter works with the region’s communities to organize monthly beach clean-ups and promote environmental stewardship “to ensure safe and healthy access to coastal habitats for generations to come.”

READ ALSO: Why is it called ‘Black Friday’ anyway?

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