The Resilience BC hub, operated by the Victoria Immigrant and Refugee Centre Society, now offers access to racism and hate crime reporting and anti-racism support services online in 13 languages. (Photo vircs.com)

The Resilience BC hub, operated by the Victoria Immigrant and Refugee Centre Society, now offers access to racism and hate crime reporting and anti-racism support services online in 13 languages. (Photo vircs.com)

Victoria-led anti-racism initiative broadens reach, lowers barriers

Access to Resilience BC’s online hub now available in 13 languages

Removing barriers to reporting incidents of racism or race-based hate has been one of the key mandates for operators of the Resilience BC hub.

Run by the Victoria Immigrant and Refugee Centre Society, the online resource now offers access to services and information in 13 languages. That has helped to broaden the reach of the message delivered by the Resilience BC Anti-Racism Network, which calls for communities to work together to end racism and hate.

“Being able to access this important information in the language of your choice opens up opportunities for learning and for connecting with supports,” society executive director Karen Hira said in a release.

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The site offers such resources as videos for bystanders and victims, reading recommendations and a database where viewers can read or connect with anti-racism experts and diversity, equity and inclusion consultants.

Languages now offered on the provincially funded site include Arabic, traditional and simplified Chinese, French, Hindi, Japanese, Korean, Persian, Punjabi, Spanish, Filipino (Tagalog) and Vietnamese as well as English.

Among other offerings on the site are access to a variety of anti-racism resources – in written and video formats – feature stories about residents’ lived experiences, and how-tos on reporting incidents of racism and hate. There’s also an interactive map designed to connect users with network members closest to them.

“It’s important that British Columbians have access to the services and information they need in the language they feel the most comfortable in,” said Rachna Singh, B.C. parliamentary secretary for anti-racism initiatives. “This is even more important when these resources are to help them report racist incidents, access community supports and feel safe. With these additional languages, even more racialized communities will benefit from the work that Resilience BC is doing.”

For more information on the Resilience BC Anti-Racism Network, visit ResilienceBC.ca. To learn about other provincial anti-racism initiatives, go to engage.gov.bc.ca/antiracism.


 

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