Beats Workin' perform for the Sooke Coffee House on February 15.

Beats Workin will work with the audience

Sooke Coffee House concert on February 15 will feature swing, roots and beats

Beats Workin plays and sings material ranging from their own energetic original songs and instrumentals, right down through music of the 1940s and beyond, they keep the beat workin on guitars, upright bass and resophonic steel guitars.

Beats Workin was conceived by Bob de Wolff and David K. sometime in the past 20 years, during informal picking sessions and parties, but they were missing a key ingredient. In May 2013, they met Mark Johnson and a musical match was made. There was now a fine acoustic bass to drive the rhythm of the songs and the vocal harmonies found a third voice.

Three words describe Beats Workin’s music: swing, roots and blues.

Beats Workin is first and foremost, musical. The beats work. The audience shares the rich arrangements whether the songs are silly or serious. Each member brings considerable performance experience to the group. The audience feels comfortable that it is in great hands.

Each member can hold down the rhythm as well as solo on his instrument. In addition, David and Mark bring finely crafted original material. Bob adds extensive knowledge of swing and jump blues.

Beats Workin’s mix of acoustic bass, acoustic and archtop guitars, 7 and 6 string resophonic steel string guitars is an exciting blend. Topped that up with David and Bob’s lead vocals and you have a winning combination.

Here is a little bit about the members of Beats Workin:

David K.

Somewhere out there is a crossroad where old jazzy blues collides with country. It’s there you’ll find David K, creating his unique blend of acoustic music. David K has toured extensively and is a dynamic solo performer, songwriter, and side-musician, whose performances have been highly praised on both sides of the Atlantic.

Mark Johnson has been playing music since he was able move his hands and bang the keys of his family piano. He took up bass in his teenage years and has been performing professionally since. He has always been a roots musician at heart but is also deeply attracted to the mysterious, colorful harmonies and grooves or Jazz and world music.

Bob de Wolff is a seasoned musician with a lifetime involvement in music and the arts. He has been a singer and guitarist who has played in musical groups since the mid-1960s.  His current musical love is the swing music of the 1930s, 40s and 50s, in particular, the music of Louis Jordan, Slim and Slam and Bennie Goodman and an abiding love of roots music.

Please do join us Saturday, January 15 for what should prove to be an enjoyable evening of song and banter.

The place is Holy Trinity Anglican Church on Murray Road. Doors open at 7 p.m. with open stage at 7:30 p.m. and our feature at 9 p.m.

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