Folk singing road-survivor has paid his dues

Steve Palmer on tap at Coffee House Saturday night

Steve Palmer will be performing for the Sooke Coffee House on Saturday

On Saturday, February 19, the Sooke Folk Music Society brings Steve Palmer to our monthly Coffee House evening at Holy Trinity Anglican Church.

Raised on gospel, country and the blues, the old time influences on a young prairie picker with a love of Doc Watson made him a good fit for psychedelic folk-rock bands touring and playing support for most of the big name suspects during the ‘60s U.K. invasion. And then more steady dues paid as guitarist-for-hire in country bands working the rural Alberta bar scene. He started using his voice only in the ‘80s, when he’d picked some West Coast time to study music a bit more formally. But it wasn’t ‘til he returned home to care for his mother that he found personal respite and freedom in becoming a solo performer. Now based in Moose Jaw Saskatchewan, he travels a troubadour circuit around Western Canada and the Northwestern US.

Since the 1960’s, Steve Palmer has performed in almost every size of venue; from rock arenas to pubs, coffee houses and churches. His early folk-rock groups opened for many legendary rock acts including Led Zeppelin, The Who and Cream.

Forty years as a traveling musician is a lot of road, and Palmer has gone back to his acoustic roots and is still playing and still touring. Grown enough to sing about life and simple pleasures with all the unhurried authority of a quiet and simple folk singing road-survivor.

With three critically acclaimed albums – Here To Nashville, Roots and Strings and 2008’s Morning Road to his credit, Steve continues to perform at Folk Clubs and Festivals throughout Western Canada.

“Sometimes compared to Hoyt Axton, Leonard Cohen, or John Prine, the echoes of Doc Watson remain clear on his albums, Roots and Strings and Morning Road, says Colin Lazzerini in the Root Cellar.

Please join us for an evening of stellar music from this seasoned singer/songwriter. It all happens on Saturday at Holy Trinity Anglican Church, 1962 Murray Road. Doors open at 7 p.m. with open stage at 7:30 and our feature at 9.

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