Rapper Nelly seeks dismissal of lawsuit alleging sex assault

The lawsuit is before a St. Louis court, the rapper’s hometown

The rapper Nelly is asking a U.S. court to dismiss a British woman’s lawsuit that alleges he sexually assaulted her after a concert in England.

The federal lawsuit was filed in November in St. Louis, the rapper’s hometown. The woman accuses Nelly, whose real name is Cornell Haynes Jr., of assaulting her in a dressing room at the concert venue in Essex in December 2017. Nelly hasn’t been criminally charged and has denied the allegations.

The woman is identified only as Jane Doe in the lawsuit.

READ MORE: Sony drops R. Kelly after furor over allegations

Nelly’s attorney, Scott Rosenblum, filed a response to the lawsuit Thursday, arguing that the woman shouldn’t be allowed to remain anonymous and “avoid public scrutiny.”

The woman alleges that she paid to have her photo taken with the 44-year-old rapper after the concert before he took her to a separate room and sexually assaulted her.

The woman’s attorney, Karen Koehler, said the woman reported the incident to police more than a year ago and she believes the investigation is ongoing. Essex police didn’t immediately respond to an after-hours phone message from The Associated Press seeking information Friday.

Rosenblum argued that a “cloak of anonymity” for the accuser invites people with personal vendettas “to use the federal court system as a tool to inflict calculated harm against others’ reputations” while protecting themselves from scrutiny “that false accusations properly risk and invite.”

READ MORE: Celine Dion pulling 1998 R. Kelly collaboration from streaming services

The lawsuit is the second such case filed against the rapper. In September, Nelly settled a lawsuit filed by a woman who alleged he raped her on his tour bus in suburban Seattle.

Police in Washington arrested Nelly in October 2017, but prosecutors didn’t file charges, citing a lack of co-operation by the accuser. Rosenblum said those accusations were fabricated.

Jim Salter, The Associated Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

‘It consumed my life’: Inside the world of gaming addiction

World Health Organization classifies gaming disorder as a mental health condition

BC Parks accepting application student ranger hiring program for its second year

48 students will get to have a summer job in the outdoors including in Goldstream Park

Whitecaps favourite switches to the Island

Marcel de Jong worked to end Whitecaps contract, joining Pacific FC on the ground floor

Snow not melting fast enough for some Greater Victoria residents

Resident unhappy with lack of snow removal on Mount Doug trails

‘Riya was a dreamer’: Mother of slain 11-year-old Ontario girl heartbroken

Her father, Roopesh Rajkumar, 41, was arrested some 130 kilometres away

Police dog tracks suspect through wintry Vancouver Island backcountry

Assault suspect arrested after two-hour track by Nanaimo RCMP police dog Jager

Trudeau takes personal hit amid SNC-Lavalin controversy: poll

Overall, 41 per cent of respondents believed the prime minister had done something wrong in the affair

B.C. photographer captures otters on ice

A Langley photographer was at the right place at the right time on the Fraser River

Unplowed Roads parody song destined to be a classic

Move over Weird Al, Island elementary students on the same level

Do you live with your partner? More and more Canadians don’t

Statistics Canada shows fewer couples live together than did a decade ago

B.C. child killer denied mandatory outings from psychiatric hospital

The B.C. Review Board decision kept things status quo for Allan Schoenborn

Vancouver Island Pride Weekend coming to Mt. Washington

VIP events will be held Feb. 28 to March 3

Searchers return to avalanche-prone peak in Vancouver to look for snowshoer

North Shore Rescue, Canadian Avalanche Rescue Dog teams and personnel will be on Mt. Seymour

Most Read