David Wighton of East Sooke.

Retired teacher creates dark universe

It wasn’t until he retired from his career as a teacher when his drive for writing really came through.

David Wighton of East Sooke always liked books and writing. He thought about it hard. Then, one day, it clicked: why not create a universe of his own.

It wasn’t until he retired from his career as a teacher when his drive for writing really came through.

“I retired, so then I thought, what am I going to do with myself?”

So he started with an initial premise: what would happen if heaven and hell were bureaucracies? Then he invented a group of demons and a bunch of angels, made it whimsical – and voila.

The story was more of a project than a book though, but it gave Wighton the kick off into the world of writing and character development.

“I was so consumed by it, writing eight hours a day. I’d go in, write a chapter, it was like, woah, where is this coming from,” he chuckled.

The theme was too niche, however, with no firm target audience, so he switched gears into another realm, this time aimed towards younger readers, albeit with a much darker, more realistic setting, starting with I Got’cha!

“Its basis is the world, set in the future, has suffered from climate change, loss of oil, everything throughout the world is destroyed, a total dystopian environment,” he said, adding this was the start of his Wilizy series, which revolves around two teenage protagonists, Will, a genius scientist, and Lizzy, a trained assassin.

Both characters come from opposing sides of conflict; one, a scientist for a regime ruled by a vicious dictator who controls bio-engineered humans with limited self-awareness, and a rebel, whose fight against oppression is their sole purpose in life.

As the story progresses (which spans across 10 books and is still ongoing) Wilizy change, their priorities and perception change, while they also interact with other characters of the realm, such as a First Nation family who stands against the regime.

“They eventually adopt the two heroes, so in a way you have a family that grows bigger and bigger across each book,” Wighton said.

And while both characters are technically orphans, he noted family is a strong driver in the Wilizy series.

“Family was the hook. He doesn’t have a family, he’s a product of a genetic machine, and she’s just a killer,” he said, adding that the two go through all the challenges all teens face today.

Between invisible ships, flying submarines, crazy superpowers and deeply rooted messages of political, social and environmental factors, Wighton’s stories are about getting young people to think about the world they live in, and what it can become if no one paid attention anymore.

To read David Wighton’s Wilizy series, go to smashwords.com/profile/view/wilizy, all of which can be accessed for free.

 

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Sooke council approves new funding for chamber of commerce

A $16,000 service agreement to be created

Sooke council delays vote on Whiffin Spit memorial wall

Sooke district council has again delayed a decision to erect a memorial… Continue reading

VIDEO: Langford man battling cancer honored with hot rod, motorcycle procession

Friends and family support Patrick O’Hara on his 73rd birthday

Langford Fire calm mother and daughter after being trapped in elevator

Three-year-old girl given stuffed animal to calm nerves

Langford businesses can expand onto sidewalks, public spaces

Council passes new bylaw supporting business expansion

B.C. legislature coming back June 22 as COVID-19 emergency hits record

Pandemic restrictions now longer than 2017 wildfire emergency

Facing changes together: Your community, your journalists

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the world in ways that would have… Continue reading

B.C.’s essential grocery, hardware store employees should get pandemic pay: retail group

Only B.C.’s social, health and corrections workers are eligible for top-ups

Edmonton, Vancouver and Toronto vying to be NHL hubs, but there’s a catch

The NHL unveiled a return-to-play plan that would feature 24 teams

As SD84 schools look to reopen, Kyuquot and Zeballos opt out

Schools in Tahsis and Gold River will open on June 1, with 30 per cent students expected to come in

B.C. sees 9 new COVID-19 cases, one death as officials watch for new cases amid Phase Two

Number of confirmed active cases is at 244, with 37 people in hospital

POLL: Do you agree with the provincial government’s decision to increase the minimum wage?

B.C.’s lowest-paid workers will be getting a few more dollars to try… Continue reading

Illicit-drug deaths up in B.C. and remain highest in Canada: chief coroner

More than 4,700 people have died of overdoses since B.C. declared a public health emergency in early 2016

CMHC sees declines in home prices, sales, starts that will linger to end of 2022

CMHC said average housing prices could fall anywhere from nine to 18 per cent in its forecast

Most Read