Gardening books to inspire the beginner or avid gardener.

Gardening books to inspire the beginner or avid gardener.

Gardening books to inspire you

Four books get reviewed

With the renewed interest in backyard gardens and green spaces, a series of books gives B.C. gardeners valuable information to get them started. Whether your plans are for vegetable or ornamental flower gardens, these books cover the basics. Each of the books reviewed is geared to Canadian gardeners.

 

Beginner Gardening in Canada

Author: A.H. Jackson

224 pages, soft cover

Lone Pine Publishing

 

Gardening 101 in 224 pages

 

If you have ever considered starting a garden, this little book covers all of the bases and then some.

It gets you started offering all kinds of information on climate, soils, tools and things to watch out for. The book pages are colour-coded so finding relevant information is easy. The author talks about appropriate trees, lawns, shrubs and plants for the backyard gardener. It is not a tell-all book covering everything you ever wanted to know, but it gets you enthusiastic and eager to get gardening. The tips in “managing your garden” covers natural insecticides you can concoct in your kitchen, plant diseases you can spot and problem solving.

Did you know that if you soak rhubarb leaves in water for 24 hours and add a few drops of dish soap, you can make a very effective (albeit poisonous) natural insecticide to control mites and aphids.

For the beginner this is a terrific little primer for the backyard, patio or balcony gardener. It is easy to read, well organized and well thought out. It’s all you need to get started.

Author A.H. Jackson was born into a family of food processors, where he experienced the food business from harvest to table.

 

Gardening with Colour

Creative Design Ideas for Canadian Gardens

Author: Rob Sproule

320 pages, soft cover

Lone Pine Publishing

 

Everyone seems to admire floral gardens that have seemingly bloomed in a most amazing coordinated way.

The hues and complementary colours are not random, they have most likely been chosen by a gardener with an eye for balance and design.

Author Rob Sproule takes the novice gardener through the process of planning and planting around the elements and principles of good design. In other words simple universal rules for what looks good and what doesn’t.

In his book Sproule has 60 feature designs, each with a diagram, list of ingredients and care instructions. In turn each of the designs is looked at asking the following five questions: size and habit; exposure;moisture; fertilizer and compatibility. He talks of colour theory, containers, soil mixes, groupings, focal points and planting tips. A lot of information is packed into this book and it is inspirational and makes one want to get their flowers coordinated both by size and colour.

For each of the 60 feature designs Sproule tells you what plants to buy, colours to match and what type of containers best show off your efforts. He talks of creating backdrops and visual interest thus moving away from the ordinary.

This book is well worth the price, if only for the pleasure of inspiring the avid floral gardener.

Rob Sproule feels privileged to share his passion with gardeners. He especially loves to talk with gardeners who are just starting out and eager to get their fingers in the dirt.

 

Vegetable Gardening for British Columbia

Author: Laura Peters

272 pages soft cover

Lone Pine Publishing

 

With the increased awareness and attraction to growing one’s own food, this liitle paperback book may be just the thing to get one going on their own backyard vegetable garden.

From small container boxes to wide open space, Laura Peters talks about it all in an easy to understand way. She walks you through the process of starting a garden. There is a section on plant disease and insects and what to do about them. She tells you how to make manure tea and handle compost.

The vegetables are in alphabetical order and she provides information on starting, growing, harvesting, tips, and problems and pests on each plant. The colour photographs add immensely to the book. Not every vegetable you can think of is included, but most of those you would want to grow and harvest are.

There is a section on “other” plants you can grow that may not be classified as vegetables, plants such as fiddlehead ferns and amaranth.

In the appendix she lists companion plants.

For the more experienced backyard gardener or the beginner this book is well laid out and informative without boring one with far too much detail. If you have to get one book to get started gardening, this would be an excellent choice.

Laura Peters is a certified, seasoned Master Gardener, garden writer and photographer with over 30 gardening books to her credit. She has worked in almost every aspect of the horticulture business.

 

Just Ask Jerry

Good Answers to Tough Canadian Gardening Questions

Author: Jerry Filipski

240 pages, soft cover

Lone Pine Publishing

 

David Tarrant, host for CBC’s Canadian Gardener said his forward to Just Ask Jerry, that if he had of thought about what the best gardening book would read like, it would be based on all the notes kept about actual gardening you did in your own backyard.

Jerry Filipski is a gardener and he, in his time, has asked a lot of questions. His book is where the answers are found.

He talks of getting started and the equipment needed, what to look for in soil and how to beef it up, composting, mulching and fertilizing. He answers common questions on the most popular topics. Want to know about lilacs or why there are racks in the top of your tomatoes? The answers are there.

It’s common sense advice to common questions. Even if you don’t have your questions answered, you still gain some knowledge from other people’s questions. It’s a good read for gardeners of any ilk.

Vegetable gardening, perennials, lawns, container gardening and trees and shrubs are all covered.

Jerry Filipski has been helping gardeners for more than 20 years as the gardening columnist for the Edmonton Journal. Since retiring Jerry and his garden are now one.

The books are priced from $18.95 to $24.95 look for them at local book stores or visit www.lonepinepublishing.com.

Just Posted

VicPd are asking for the public’s help in finding Camper, a lost pit bull who ran away after their owner’s van was reportedly attacked by a man with a hammer on June 12. (Courtesy of VicPD)
Edmonton man reportedly smashes van’s windows with hammer while woman and her dog inside

VicPD are asking for help to find Camper, the woman’s dog who ran away during the Friday incident

Red arrow shows the existing warehouse that is home to a variety of specialized equipment used by the Capital Region Emergency Services Telecommunications (CREST). The service provider is looking for a new home that will protect the equipment in the event of an earthquake or other natural disaster. (Google Maps)
CREST telecoms look to find a post-seismic facility in Greater Victoria

The move will better protect equipment vital to its 50 emergency service clients across the CRD

(Black Press Media file photo)
FRESH AND LOCAL: Greater Victoria farm markets ready to greet shoppers

A list of markets on the go this spring and summer, right into fall

A client and a staff member embark on an art project at Oak Bay United Church. (Christine van Reewyk/News Staff)
VIDEO: Oak Bay group of adults with developmental disabilities promotes community inclusivity

Victoria Community Connections moved to Oak Bay late last year

Nathan Watts, a member of the Tseshaht First Nation near Port Alberni, shares his story of substance use, a perspective he said isn’t seen enough. (Photo courtesy of Nathan Watts)
Public shaming, hate perpetuates further substance use: UVic researcher

Longtime addict Nathan Watts offers a user’s perspective on substance use

At an outdoor drive-in convocation ceremony, Mount Royal University bestows an honorary Doctor of Laws on Blackfoot Elder and residential school survivor Clarence Wolfleg in Calgary on Tuesday, June 8, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
‘You didn’t get the best of me’: Residential school survivor gets honorary doctorate

Clarence Wolfleg receives honorary doctorate from Mount Royal University, the highest honour the school gives out

Denmark’s Christian Eriksen receives medical attention after collapsing during the Euro 2020 soccer championship group B match between Denmark and Finland at Parken stadium in Copenhagen, Saturday, June 12, 2021. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner, Pool)
Denmark soccer player Christian Eriksen collapses during game against Finland

Eriksen was given chest compressions after collapsing on the field during a European Championship

Members of the Department of Fisheries and Oceans’ Marine Mammal Response Program rescued an adult humpback what that was entangled in commercial fishing gear in the waters off of Entrance Island on Thursday, June 10. (Photo courtesy Marine Mammal Response Program)
Rescuers free humpback ‘anchored’ down by prawn traps off Vancouver Island

Department of Fisheries and Oceans responders spend hours untangling whale

As stories of the horrors of residential schools circulate after the Tk’emlups te Secwepemc First Nation announced it had located what are believed to be the remains of 215 children, Grand Chief Stewart Phillip of the Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs said he feels a connection with the former students. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
2 sides of the same coin: Ex-foster kids identify with residential school survivors

Grand Chief Stewart Phillip says the child welfare system takes Indigenous children from their families

Nathan Watts, a member of the Tseshaht First Nation near Port Alberni, shares his story of substance use, a perspective he said isn’t seen enough. (Photo courtesy of Nathan Watts)
Public shaming, hate perpetuates further substance use: UVic researcher

Longtime addict Nathan Watts offers a user’s perspective on substance use

57-year-old Kathleen Richardson was discovered deceased in her home Wednesday, June 9, 2021. Her death is considered a homicide and connected to the slain brothers found on a Naramata forest road. (Submitted)
Condolences pour in for Kathy Richardson, Naramata’s 3rd homicide victim in recent weeks

Richardson was well liked in the community, a volunteer firefighter with a home-based salon

A person receives a COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination clinic run by Vancouver Coastal Health, in Richmond, B.C., Saturday, April 10, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
More than 75% of B.C. adults have 1st dose of COVID vaccine

The federal government has confirmed a boost in the Moderna vaccine will be coming later this month

Airport ground crew offload a plane carrying just under 300,000 doses of the single-shot Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine which is developed by the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies at Pearson International Airport during the COVID-19 pandemic in Toronto on Wednesday, April 28, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
1st batch of Johnson & Johnson vaccines won’t be released in Canada over quality concerns

The vaccines were quarantined in April before they were distributed to provinces

Most Read