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Make death wait: Improve your health

February is Heart Month and the door-to-door fundraising campaign is beginning

February is Heart Month

Pirjo Raits

Sooke News Mirror

They are out and about and they may be knocking on your door. Who are they? The volunteers who make death wait.

Not a great description but an apt one.

February is Heart Month and volunteer canvassers will be out in Sooke and area spreading information and gathering donations.  When you donate to the Heart and Stroke Foundation,  you are helping the foundation fund vital research, support health education and advocate for change.

Beth Pattullo is one such volunteer and every year she comes into the Sooke News Mirror office to make sure she hands out information about the Heart & Stroke Foundation.

She says many “younger” women are having heart attacks and dealing with heart disease. It can happen to anyone and it does with increasing frequency. Lifestyle and genetics play a large role in any medical condition and it is important for women especially to know the symptoms.

Among the most common symptoms of an impending heart attack are well known and include discomfort, pain and heaviness in the chest, indigestion, dizziness, anxiety and cold sweats. It is commonly thought that men were more prone to heart attacks than women, this is not correct.

“Some symptoms you just would not associate with the heart,” said Pattullo.

Chest pain is the hallmark symptom of a heart attack but when it comes to heart attack symptoms in women, you might be surprised to find that one study showed nearly 43 per cent of those in the study who suffered a heart attack didn’t have any chest pain at all.  Heart attack symptoms in women are often not atypical and can include:

• Shortness of breath

• Upper abdominal pain

•  Weakness

• Unusual fatigue

•  Lower chest pain

• Indigestion like symptoms

•  Upper back pain

If you are concerned about your situation, talk to your doctor.

If you think you are in danger, call 9-1-1 immediately.*

There are many ways you can help prevent heart attack and stroke by eating better, getting more active and living a healthier lifestyle.

On the website of the Heart & Stroke Foundation you can take a simple test to assess your risk of heart attack or stroke. It takes only a couple of minutes and it can help you see where you can improve your life and lessen your risk for heart attack or stroke.

Go to: www: heartandstroke.bc.ca. for information, healthy recipes and the risk assessment.

 

 

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