Peter McCartney (right), climate campaigner for the Wilderness Committee, delivers more than 16,000 signatures in support of a provincial ban on fracking to Green Party MLA Sonia Furstenau. (Keri Coles/News staff)

16,000 signatures supporting a ban on fracking delivered to B.C. legislature

Wilderness Committee delivers petition to Green Party MLA Sonia Furstenau

A black, 15-foot fracking rig built out of PVC piping adorned the front steps of the B.C. legislature Wednesday as a backdrop to a petition drop calling for a province-wide ban on fracking.

The Wilderness Committee delivered more than 16,000 signatures in brown boxes to Green Party MLA Sonia Furstenau at the provincial legislature “with hopes to preempt the 9,000 new frack wells needed for two liquified natural gas (LNG) projects on the coast.”

RELATED: LNG can help B.C. prepare for future energy sources, prof says

A $40-billion LNG project, announced in October, will carry natural gas through a pipeline from the Peace region to Kitimat before being shipped overseas. It marks the largest private-sector investment in Canadian history.

“Communities here in B.C. and across the world are already reeling from the impacts of climate change,” said climate campaigner Peter McCartney, who passed the signatures over to Furstenau. “But fracking continues to poison vast amounts of precious water and accelerate the climate crisis even as renewable energy gets cheaper every day.”

Furstenau said she will present the petition after question period in the legislature Wednesday afternoon.

“It’s time for us to reorient towards a cleaner, greener energy in B.C.,” said Furstenau. “In the face of the mounting consequences of climate change, the last thing we need to do is add more incentive and provide more public funding to an industry that is contributing to climate change, which we then pay for at another level of government to address those impacts.”

RELATED: B.C. NDP offers tax breaks to jumpstart LNG Canada in Kitimat

After the LNG announcement in October, Kevin Hanna, director at the Centre for Environmental Assessment Research at the University of British Columbia, told Black Press Media that if natural gas replaces coal and keeps new factories from opening in China, there is a net benefit.

“If we see it as a transitional fuel, it could put B.C. in a really good position to provide that product to market as they bring other products online,” Hanna said.

The Wilderness Committee and 16,000 British Columbians brought their voices forward to the legislature Wednesday to express concern about the potential impacts of the industry locally – to the water supply and environment.

“We’re putting these LNG producers on notice,” said McCartney. “Mark my words — it is only a matter of time until we see a ban on fracking in British Columbia, and time is short.”


 

keri.coles@blackpress.ca

Follow us on Instagram
Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Juan de Fuca curlers ‘reeling’ after learning rink will be replaced with dry floor

West Shore Parks & Recreation board says curling rinks not getting enough use

The rock is no more for Oak Bay ‘Sea Lore’

Council calls for change to controversial location proposed for art installation

Five highlights in the 2019 federal budget

Latest budget includes a sprinkling of money for voters across a wide spectrum

Facebook to overhaul ad targeting to prevent discrimination

The company is also paying about $5 million to cover plaintiffs’ legal fees and other costs

B.C. mosque part of open-house effort launched in wake of New Zealand shootings

The ‘Visit a Mosque’ campaign aims to combat Islamophobia

‘That’s a load of crap’: Dog poop conspiracy spreads in White Rock

Allegation picked up steam through a Facebook page run by a city councillor

Explosives unit brought in after suspicious boxes left at B.C. RCMP detachment

Nanaimo RCMP issues all clear after packages were found on lawn earlier in the day

2019 BUDGET: As deficit grows, feds spend on job retraining, home incentives

Stronger economy last year delivered unexpected revenue bump of an extra $27.8 billion over six years

Newfoundland man caught after posting photo of himself drinking and driving

The 19-year-old took a photo of himself holding a beer bottle and cigarette while at the wheel

Carfentanil found in 15% of overdose deaths in January: B.C. coroner

Carfentanil is 100 times more powerful than illicit fentanyl and used to tranquilize elephants

Disappearance of Merritt cowboy now deemed suspicious: police

Ben Tyner was reported missing when his riderless horse was discovered on a logging road

Most Read