B.C. drivers that create unnecessary noise with their vehicle or radio can be subject to fines under the Motor Vehicle Act. (Devon Bidal/News Staff)

B.C. drivers with noisy vehicles can be subject to hefty fines

Saanich Police explain the laws that limit excessive noise from vehicles

B.C. drivers who create excessive noise with their vehicles run this risk of receiving a hefty fine.

On Feb. 4, a driver with a noisy exhaust drove past a Saanich police officer in an unmarked vehicle. The driver was pulled over and the officer discovered that the person was prohibited from driving. The car was impounded and the driver will eventually have to appear in court.

Const. Markus Anastasiades, public information officer for the Saanich Police, explained that under the Motor Vehicle Act (MVA), unnecessary noise carries a fine of $109.

According to section 7A.01 of the MVA, any person operating their car in a way that creates loud and unnecessary noise is eligible to be fined.

Most commonly, drivers operating vehicles and motorcycles “equipped with aftermarket exhausts that create excessive noise” or are not equipped with a muffler end up getting pulled over for noise violations, Anastasiades said.

The driver of such a vehicle would be issued a violation ticket for unnecessary noise and a notice ordering that repairs be made by a specific date, he noted.

The Saanich driver whose car was impounded didn’t receive a ticket for their noisy exhaust, but they were issued an order to have the muffler repaired, Anastasiades said. The fine for ignoring the repair order could set the driver back $598.

Anastasiades pointed out that officers aren’t required to use a measuring device to prove how loud the car is. Subjective and objective evidence would be used to prove the offence, he said.

There’s also a potential for B.C. drivers to be fined for creating unnecessary noise with their vehicle in other ways.

READ ALSO: Unclear laws to blame for cupholder cellphone tickets: lawyer

The 1984 film Footloose portrayed a fictional Midwestern town of Bomont where dancing was illegal and playing loud music in the car could get you a fine.

While B.C. doesn’t have a dance ban, drivers playing their music too loudly could be subject to distracted driving laws such as driving without due care which can result in a $368 fine, Anastasiades explained.

“We recommend that motorists enjoy their music at a reasonable level that still allows them to hear sirens, horns or other sounds that would alert them to react to pending hazards,” he said.


@devonscarlett
Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

devon.bidal@saanichnews.com

Auto Repair and MaintenanceMusicPoliceSaanich Police Department

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Salmon fishing closures won’t save the whales, say critics

Federal government accused of going after salmon fishery as ‘low hanging fruit’

PHOTOS: BC Children’s lottery offers luxury downtown Victoria home as a prize

The Choices Lotto has luxury homes across the province

Island teen climber seizes last opportunity to qualify in 2020 Olympic games

Brennan Doyle, 16, heads to L.A. for Pan American Climbing Championships

University of Victoria profs take home prestigious national teaching award

Brent Mainprize and Edōsdi–Judy Thompson recognized as a 2020 3M National Teaching Fellows

Victoria modular housing complex built to house homeless Indigenous women

Spa’Qun, or ‘Flower House’ will provide shelter and cultural support

VIDEO: Alleged shoplifter caught on camera at Sidney boutique

Staff at Cameron Rose Gifts seek the public’s help locating woman

Cheapest in B.C.: Penticton gas prices dip below $1 per litre

Two stores in Penticton have gas below a dollar.

VIDEO: Outpouring of worldwide support for bullied Australian boy

Australian actor Hugh Jackman said ‘you are stronger than you know, mate’

‘A horror show:’ Ex-employee shares experience at problematic Chilliwack seniors’ home

Workers are paid below industry standard at all Retirement Concepts facilities

Forest industry protests northern B.C. caribou protection deal

B.C. Mining Association supports federal-Indigenous plan

Youth-led report calls on B.C. government to create plan to end youth homelessness

There are no dedicated programs for youth homelessness at federal, provincial level, report says

UPDATE: Lockdown lifted at Nanaimo high school following threats

Nearby elementary school was in hold-and-secure

Wolverines face elimination game at Island finals

Sooke squad lost to Nanaimo’s John Barsby last night

Trudeau: Time for blockades to end and Indigenous leaders to work with government

Prime minister says situation in Coastal GasLink pipeline dispute is ‘unacceptable and untenable’

Most Read