Surrey-Panorama MLA Jinny Sims is a former president of the B.C. Teachers’ Federation and NDP MP.

B.C. premier confident Surrey MLA can ‘clear the air’ in RCMP investigation

Jinny Sims said Monday she is not prepared to venture a guess on the nature of the investigation

A B.C. cabinet minister who abruptly resigned last week says she has not been contacted by the RCMP and remains in the dark about the allegations that led to a criminal investigation of her conduct.

Jinny Sims said Monday she is not prepared to venture a guess on the nature of the investigation.

“I don’t know what the allegations are in this instance and it would be inappropriate for me to start speculating,” she said outside the legislature. “I am looking forward to finding out as much as anyone else.”

Sims resigned as citizens’ services minister on Friday as Premier John Horgan announced a special prosecutor had been appointed to help the RCMP in their investigation of her.

“I have to let the process play out and it is a process that will take its time,” she said.

Horgan said he’s also not aware of the allegations facing Sims.

READ MORE: Vancouver lawyer named special prosecutor for investigation into Surrey MLA

“I have every confidence in Jinny,” he told a news conference at the legislature, citing her experience as the head of the B.C. Teachers’ Federation and as an MP. “I’m confident she will be able to clear the air.”

Sims said in a statement Friday that she was “confident” her name would be cleared and dismissed “previous public allegations” that were made against her as having “no credibility.” She did not say what allegations she was referring to.

The Opposition B.C. Liberals have accused Sims of using personal emails to allegedly circumvent the province’s freedom of information laws and of writing letters to support visa applications for 10 Pakistani citizens who were on a security watch list.

It is not known if the allegations about Sims’s personal email or the reference letters are the subject of the RCMP investigation.

Sims has denied any wrongdoing in the use of her emails.

She told the legislature earlier this year that she did not see the final draft of the sponsorship letters, which were sent out with her electronic signature.

“I take responsibility for what happened,” she added. “When I became aware of the issue, I immediately had a serious conversation with the staff to ensure that it would not happen again.”

The RCMP has not commented on its investigation.

The prosecution service said Monday that it appointed a special prosecutor after receiving a formal request from the Mounties on Sept. 30 to consider such an appointment to give legal advice into allegations of criminal wrongdoing against Sims and “other persons unknown” to the service.

In the legislature on Monday, Liberal house leader Mary Polak asked Horgan if the government failed to properly investigate the allegations that were made in March.

“The minister has now resigned and is the subject of an active police investigation in relation to criminal wrongdoing,” said Polak, who added that she also wrote to the RCMP, the Ministry of the Attorney General and the prosecution service. “Will the premier admit he and his government were wrong to have dismissed these allegations in the first place?”

Horgan said an examination of the Liberal allegations were reviewed and produced nothing.

“We did an investigation of some of the other issues that were raised, found no evidence, and at that time advised the Opposition that if they had more to say, they should talk to the RCMP,” he said.

Horgan said he heard nothing further until Friday when Attorney General David Eby told him of the appointment of a special prosecutor.

Dirk Meissner, The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Son of Second World War veteran returns to Norway to see site of rescue, repatriation

Six-man crew crash lands in Nazi occupied territory, only known instance of entire crew surviving

War bride’s oversea voyage to Canada took a leap of faith

More than 45,000 women immigrated to Canada after the Second World War

One woman’s scrapbook uncovered at Fort Rodd Hill tells story of thousands during Second World War

Joyce Margaret Whitney served in the Canadian Women’s Army Corps from 1942 to 1946

A time of remembrance

Hundreds gather at Canadian Legion to honour those who have served and sacrificed

VIDEO: Hundreds gather at Langford’s Veterans Memorial Park for Remembrance Day

More than 65 wreaths laid, including homemade wreath from Afghan veteran

VIDEO: Hong Kong police shoot protester, man set on fire

It was the second protester shot since the demonstrations began in early June

Victoria Jazz Orchestra concert raises funds for the Single Parents’ Resource Centre

Maria Manna on tap for the Nov. 16 performance in Victoria

Renowned men’s chorus ‘Back by Popular Demand’ in Victoria

One of Canada’s premier singing ensembles kicks off its 39th season on Nov. 16

Mexican culinary celebration fills Victoria Public Market

Taco, Tequila and Margarita Fiesta takes over the Victoria Public Market the evening of Nov. 16

Sportsnet fires Don Cherry after negative comments about immigrants

Don Cherry had said immigrants don’t wear poppies like other Canadians do

Trudeau’s new cabinet: Gender parity because it’s 2019? Or due to competence?

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will soon appoint his new cabinet

Canada among three G20 countries least likely to hit emissions targets

It says Canada, South Korea and Australia are the farthest off

Conservatives’ Scheer wants Trudeau to open Parliament Nov. 25

That’s five days after Justin Trudeau is scheduled to swear in a new cabinet

Last remaining Centurion tank from the Korean War makes its journey ‘home’ to B.C.

Tank arrives in B.C. the day before Remembrance Day after a more than 4,500-kilometre transfer

Most Read