Bear Buzz, September 10, 2014

Building electric fencing workshop set for September 19

  • Sep. 10, 2014 2:00 p.m.
Bear and human interaction can  be prevented.

Bear and human interaction can be prevented.

Chickens attracted a family unit of three bears to a rural home near Sooke. Before their introduction to humans and human foods they were probably living a wild life accessing all sorts of wild foods with a healthy respect for humans and an understanding of the danger that the humans posed to the bears.  When the sow discovered the chickens, they stopped by for a feed.

“Three bears have been destroyed this season, just in this neighborhood,” said Debbie Read of WildSafeBC, “And if we don’t take precautions to set up electric fencing around our chickens more destruction are likely to follow.

“It is frustrating that people don’t understand that it is not the Conservation Officer’s fault that bears are being destroyed, but instead, it is our own fault for creating the unsafe situation in the first place.

Read went on to ask people to, “Keep your garbage secure, pick your fruit and keep the ground clear of windfalls, put away the bird feeders until the winter, and use electric fencing to protect your chickens, bees or other small livestock.”

Since some people are new to the process of setting electric fences up, Read has arranged for a workshop on the subject for September 19 at 10 a.m. at the Sooke Region Museum, corner of Sooke Road and Phillips Road.  WildSafe BC Provincial Coordinator, Frank Ritcey, will teach this great, efficient, cost effective, fencing system.

This is a free workshop but participants are asked to register by contacting Ms. Read at capitalregionaldistrict@wildsafebc.com or by phone at 250-646-2997.

“If we all work together we can help keep wildlife wild and our community safe” added Read.

Debbie  Read – WildsafeBC