The Canadian Cancer Society is helping spark new ways for cancer research to flourish. The annual Daffodil campaign is back, to help raise funds and improve the quality of life for those affected by all types of cancer. (Photo by Mabel Amber/Pixabay)

The Canadian Cancer Society is helping spark new ways for cancer research to flourish. The annual Daffodil campaign is back, to help raise funds and improve the quality of life for those affected by all types of cancer. (Photo by Mabel Amber/Pixabay)

Canadian Cancer Society helps bloom new research initiatives

Annual Daffodil Campaign returns, donations accepted virtually

  • Apr. 5, 2021 1:30 p.m.

The Canadian Cancer Society is helping spark new ways for cancer research initiatives to flourish.

The annual Daffodil Campaign is back to help raise funds and improve the quality of life for those affected by all types of cancer.

Through Daffodil Campaign efforts, the Canadian Cancer Society invested in Spark Grants, which funds innovative ideas in transformative cancer care, as well as cancer prevention and early detection strategies.

Spark Grants are a $4 million joint initiative by the Canadian Cancer Society, Canadian Institutes of Health Research and Brain Canada. The goal is to provide 27 grants to various projects across Canada.

“To kick off the Canadian Cancer Society’s annual Daffodil Campaign, we are proud to highlight innovative research projects that our donors are helping to fund,” said CEO Andrea Seale, in a press release. “These unique projects are harnessing the potential of cutting-edge technologies like artificial intelligence, smart devices and robotics to revolutionize cancer care and save lives.”

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Some of the unique research initiatives being funded include a test that screens for lung cancer by evaluating chemicals in breath and sweat, a nano-sized thermometer that detects early stage skin cancers, and whether or not contact lenses can provide information about the wearer’s risk for breast cancer.

“We urgently need new approaches and support from our communities so that more cancers can be prevented or detected earlier, when treatments are most likely to work,” stated Seale. “We are calling on all Canadians to support the Daffodil Campaign as the most impactful way to push the boundaries and improve the quality of life for people affected by cancer.”

Due to circumstances of the pandemic, the Daffodil campaign will look a little different again this year, as donations will only be accepted online. There will be no daffodil pins or fresh flowers sold, or door-to-door canvassing this year.

“Despite having to extend the suspension of its traditional face-to-face activities for the second year in a row, the organization’s investments in research, including Spark Grants, continue to offer a ray of hope,” the release said. “When daffodils bloom, hope grows.”

To donate visit cancer.ca/daffodil.

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