“Ravens” at the development stage, planning the layout of their housing. (Ravens Crossing Co-Housing submission)

Happy Hygge housing breaking ground in Sidney

Shovels in ground Aug. 19, information talk Aug. 24

Construction workers are set to break-ground next week on Sidney’s own Danish-style happy Hygge housing development.

Ravens Crossing is a group of investor-owners building housing units based on the Scandinavian concept of co-housing. They think the development will be more personalized to the residents moving in and will provide greater well-being and sense of community.

RELATED: Danish-style happy Hygge housing coming to Sidney

They break ground on the project on Monday, Aug. 19 at 1 p.m.

The Danes have a concept called Hygge (pronounced Hoo-Gah), which roughly translates as coziness and the combination of elements that make a happy life. The home is a central tenet of this philosophy, with a warm community and a comfortable domicile pillars of an enjoyable life.

“It’s multi-generational and located right by Sidney Elementary,” says Barb Whittington, one of the group’s co-founders. “It has a real heart to it and for people who are environmentally conscious and want to live on a smaller footprint, find it ideal.”

ALSO READ: Reay Creek clean-up to begin near Victoria International Airport

With that in mind, Ravens Crossing secured planning permission to build a block of apartments, each containing private individual units, but with all common amenities shared for communal use. Co-housing differs considerably from communal living, with increased privacy being one factor.

The group are excited to break ground on the development, and will do so in the company of MLA Adam Olsen and at least two Peninsula mayors. Also attending will be fellow “Ravens” who have bought units and a supportive contingent from Denmark itself.

Whittington says one of the benefits of co-housing is that future residents had a hand in the designing of the development, and know each other already.

“Everybody already knows each other, because we’ve already worked together and made decisions together. We’ll have even more opportunity to work and play together, and be of some help to one another as much as each household individually wants,” says Whittington.

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The development group have so far sold 24 units but are looking for 11 households of new neighbours. There are still one-, two- and three-bedroom apartments available. Units will be in the region of $600,000.

Ravens Crossing hosts an information evening at McTavish Academy of Art on Aug. 24 from 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. They also offer virtual information sessions online. For this or more information on the apartments visit ravenscrossingcohousing.ca.



nick.murray@peninsulanewsreview.com

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Some of the owners and future residents of units in the new Sidney development. (Ravens Crossing Co-Housing submission)

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