Jordan River gets research funding

$9,930 in project funding from the Fish and Wildlife Compensation Program.

  • Apr. 10, 2013 5:00 p.m.

The Fish and Wildlife Compensation Program (FWCP) has announced funding to D. Burt and Associates that will go towards two research projects at Jordan River.

FWCP funds are provided through BC Hydro and managed in a partnership with the Province of British Columbia and Fisheries and Oceans Canada to conserve and enhance fish, wildlife and their supporting habitats affected by the creation of BC Hydro owned and operated generation facilities in the Coastal, Columbia and Peace regions of British Columbia.

FWCP has committed $9,930 to projects at the Jordan River in 2013. All research and project work will take place in 2013/2014.

“These two research projects follow a very successful wetland enhancement project completed at the Diversion Reservoir in 2010,” says FWCP Coastal program manager, Allister McLean. “We are now going to take a look at studying habitat and fish in the lower Jordan River which will ideally lead to habitat enhancement.”

Applications are reviewed annually in the Coastal region by both technical and board-level committees that include representation from all program partners, First Nations and the public. Projects are chosen based on technical merit, cost vs. benefit, level of partnership, linkages to watershed-specific priorities and overall benefit to the FWCP’s mandate and vision.

For 2013, the FWCP’s total funding for the 15 hydroelectric systems within the Coastal region will be $1.6 million.

For more information and to find out how you can apply for next year’s funding visit fwcp.ca.

 

Projects funded in 2012-2013

• The first project is a Feasibility Study to improve fish habitat in the lower Jordan River (near the generating station) ($4,944).

This includes an assessment of vehicle/machine access, local topography, sources of water, testing of the quality of water and discussion with the local land owner.

• The second project ($4,986.40) is an Assessment of Gravel and Stranding Fish Risks.

It will include an assessment of the gravel quantity, quality and stability in the lower Jordan River and determine the potential risks of stranding for both adults and emergent fry.

The lower Jordan River was one of the main spawning areas for pink salmon and recent anecdotal observations suggest some spawning activity and egg deposition since initiation of the flow release at Elliott Dam.

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