The City of Victoria has released new draft economic plan called Victoria 3.0. (Nicole Crescenzi/News Staff)

Latest Victoria economic plan features new conference centre, downtown tech transformations

Victoria 3.0 aims to change the city’s brand between now and 2041

Victoria City council is launching a new economic plan to take the city into 2041.

Victoria 3.0 – Pivoting to a Higher Value Economy, is a draft plan which the public can provide public feedback on beginning Thursday evening.

The plan aims to shape a “sustainable, growing and influential city which creates high-value jobs.”

It includes some larger endeavors, such as transforming the industrial area along Store Street into an “innovation district” beginning this year until 2022. This might include mixed-used developments, a working dock, and and ocean and marine hub. Victoria Mayor Lisa Helps is leading that endeavor along with local property owners.

ALSO READ: City of Victoria looks for feedback on proposed 2020 budget

“The vision of Victoria 3.0 is that as the Capital City, Victoria is future-ready and globally-fluent. Victoria 3.0 identifies how we can use our status as a small powerhouse to build a high-value economy that meets our needs now and anticipates the future,” Helps said in a statement.

Victoria 3.0 also aims to create an Oceans Future Cluster from 2020 to 2022, banding marine research technologies together into one neighbourhood.

“To develop the Ocean Futures Cluster, we will build on major assets like the University of Victoria’s Ocean Networks Canada, the Victoria Shipyards (operated by Seaspan), the Esquimalt Graving Dock including Babcock Canada and Lockheed Martin Canada, the Institute of Ocean Sciences and the Camosun Coastal Centre — all of the supply chains around the CFB Esquimalt and Point Hope Shipyard, and all the ocean and marine-related businesses in our region to create a 22nd-century-oriented ocean and marine economic cluster,” the plan reads.

ALSO READ: Victoria Police Department requests $2.5 million increase for 2020 budget

Victoria also plans on redeveloping the Victoria Conference Centre between now and 2031, with feasibility studies and designs being completed by 2022.

“Our current facility only allows us to host one small conference at a time,” the report reads. “Our desired future state is to be able to host two, mid-sized conferences concurrently or one large meeting. In order to achieve these objectives, and the greater economic returns that will come with them, a significant renovation or rebuild is necessary.”

The City also aims to re-brand the city and its story between 2022 and 2026.

A handful of invested parties will be introduced to the draft plan Thursday evening, but the general public can learn more and provide feedback through an online survey by visiting victoria.ca/prosperity. The survey will be online until Jan. 30.

nicole.crescenzi@vicnews.com

Like us on Facebook, send a Tweet to @NicoleCrescenzi
and follow us on Instagram

City of Victoriaeconomy

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

T’Sou-ke First Nation mired in legal woes over gas station development

Claims and counterclaims leave sub-contractors unpaid

West Shore grieves loss of a ‘bright light’

Scott Manning was a well-known principal, friend and community member

Quadriplegic Saanich man seeks continuity of home care from Island Health

Island Health took over home care services in November

Two new hybrid BC Ferries ships christened with new names in Victoria ceremony

Island Aurora and Island Discovery will service Gulf Island and North Island routes

Pipeline dispute: Tories put no-confidence motion on House of Commons agenda

Conservatives say they have no confidence in the Trudeau government to end the rail blockades

Galchenyuk nets shootout winner as Wild edge Canucks 4-3

Vancouver tied with Calgary for second spot in NHL’s Pacific Division

B.C.’s soda drink tax will help kids lose weight, improve health, says doctor

Dr. Tom Warshawski says studies show sugary drinks contribute to obesity

A&W employees in Ladysmith get all-inclusive vacation for 10 years of service

Kelly Frenchy, Katherine Aleck, and Muriel Jack are headed on all-expenses-paid vacations

B.C. mom’s complaint about ‘R word’ in children’s ministry email sparks review

In 2020, the ‘R’ word shouldn’t be used, Sue Robins says

B.C., federal ministers plead for meeting Wet’suwet’en dissidents

Scott Fraser, Carolyn Bennett says they can be in Smithers Thursday

Province shows no interest in proposed highway between Alberta and B.C.

Province says it will instead focus on expanding the Kicking Horse Canyon to four lanes

First case of COVID-19 in B.C. has fully recovered, health officer says

Three other cases are symptom-free and expected to test negative soon

GUEST COMMENT: Chamber clears up a few misconceptions

‘We are committed to continually improving the chamber,’ says president

Most Read