(Black Press Media files)

Major donor Peter Allard takes UBC to court to get his name on all law degrees

Philanthropist claims school not adhering to 2014 agreement for his $30-million donation

The man who donated $30 million to the University of British Columbia is taking the school to court because his name is not on all degree certificates.

In a notice of civil claim filed on Nov. 5, Peter A. Allard alleges the university is reneging on the gift agreement he signed in 2014 that required UBC to “exclusively” use Peter A. Allard School of Law on degree certificates and the school’s website.

Allard’s name is synonymous with the law program at UBC; its building is known as Allard Hall. The $100,000 Allard Prize for International Integrity is awarded every two years to honour leadership in protecting human rights or fighting corruption.

The philanthropist alleges the proper wording is not used on some UBC law degree certificates, namely the Master of Laws and the Doctor of Philosophy in Law. Those degrees are handed out by the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies.

The lawsuit alleges Allard raised the issue with the law school’s assistant dean in 2016, saying he did not require his exact name on the certificates, but a “reasonable” reference to it.

In 2017, however, the claim alleges UBC president Santa Ono said the university would not pursue the matter any further and deferred to the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies.

In April 2019, an arbitrator ruled that though UBC was aware of the distinction between the graduate, post-doctoral and law school degrees, there was “no evidence” that officials deliberately withheld that information.

“They simply didn’t think of it at the time,” the decision reads.

Allard claims the arbitrator made a legal error, and asks the B.C. Supreme Court to reconsider the matter on the basis that gift agreement “makes it clear” that all law-related degrees should bear his name.

None of the allegations has been proven in court. The university has not yet filed a response.


@katslepian

katya.slepian@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

T’Sou-ke First Nation mired in legal woes over gas station development

Claims and counterclaims leave sub-contractors unpaid

Thief robs Saanich liquor store at gunpoint, takes cash register

Police ask for public’s help with ongoing investigation

Group continues to pull sunken, abandoned wrecks from Salish Sea

Dead Boats society inching towards 89 wrecks pulled from Capital Regional waters

No-cost birth control not included in 2020 B.C. budget

AccessBC team calls it a ‘missed opportunity,’ says the group won’t stop campaigning

Oak Bay’s third annual volunteer fair returns to Monterey centre

Fair a chance to celebrate volunteers success stories in Oak Bay

Blair says RCMP have met Wet’suwet’en conditions, so barricades should come down

The Wet’suwet’en’s hereditary chiefs oppose the Coastal GasLink project

PHOTOS: RCMP call on kids to name latest police puppy recruits

This year’s theme is the letter ‘N,’ and 13 German shephards must be named

B.C., federal ministers plead for meeting Wet’suwet’en dissidents

Scott Fraser, Carolyn Bennett standing by to return to Smithers

B.C. mom’s complaint about ‘R word’ in children’s ministry email sparks review

In 2020, the ‘R’ word shouldn’t be used, Sue Robins says

New Jamie Bacon trial for counselling to commit murder charge set for March 3

The trial is set to start on March 3 at B.C. Supreme Court

Federal minister pledges to meet Wet’suwet’en chiefs in B.C. over natural gas pipeline

The Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs say they are visiting Mohawk territory

2010 leader John Furlong urges Vancouver to bid for 2030 Winter Games

VANOC said the 2010 games broke even financially

Pipeline dispute: Tories put no-confidence motion on House of Commons agenda

Conservatives say they have no confidence in the Trudeau government to end the rail blockades

Most Read