Parksville’s Kaiden Finley, centre, is surrounded by his five siblings. Kaiden passed away on March 21 after a long battle with brain cancer. - Photo submitted by Tasha Finley

Mom who lost son to brain tumour in March joins the 24th annual Brain Tumour Walk

The Brain Tumour Walk takes place at the University of Victoria on Sunday, May 26

The 24th year of the annual Brain Tumour Walk is upon us but this year’s event holds special meaning as Tasha Finley, who lost her young son, Kaiden, two months ago, will join the march.

Finley noticed her son’s head tilting in March of 2017 but didn’t think much of it. She mentioned it in a routine doctors appointment three weeks later. The doctor prescribed physiotherapy. Flu-like symptoms came shortly after — headaches and vomiting left Kaiden losing weight, fast. The doctor thought it was acid reflux and prescribed antacids.

RELATED: Inspirational Vancouver Island youngster dies after battle with brain cancer

Needing a getaway, the family traveled to Victoria where Finley noticed a look on her son’s face that said he needed help urgently.

Taking Kaiden to hospital, doctors realized that something was seriously wrong but every test came back negative.

The final test they ran was a CT scan that revealed a massive tumour on the back of Kaiden’s head. It was May 7, 2017.

Kaiden had surgery to remove the tumour and fought through six weeks of high-dose radiation.

In September 2018, an MRI found six new tumours on Kaiden’s neck, brain stem and down his spine. Two weeks later the family was in palliative care with no more treatment options for Kaiden.

On Valentines Day 2019, Kaiden could still walk. Three days later, he could not.

Kaiden died in March.

RELATED: Parksville brain tumour survivor McHappy to give back

Finley says their family prayed Kaiden would make it to the Brain Tumour Walk but knows he will be there in spirit.

“He was at the event last year and was keen to raise awareness so that other families don’t follow our journey. I will continue to share Kaiden’s story in the hope that it helps other families,” she says.

The Brain Tumour Walk takes place at the University of Victoria on Sunday, May 26. Money raised at the event will fund ground-breaking research across North America in hopes of finding a cure and improving treatment for brain tumour survivors.

For more information visit www.braintumour.ca.



kendra.crighton@blackpress.ca

Follow us on Instagram
Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Land sale could threaten Shirley’s water supply: officials

Sale will allow for the subdivision and development of forestry lands

Spandads group collects, donates more than 100 used bikes

Oak Bay Bikes’ advent calendar donations go to fixing the used bikes

320 years since the ‘Big One’ doesn’t mean it’s overdue: Canada Research Chair

‘It could happen today, tomorrow or 100 years from now’

Night construction means closures for Interurban Road

Traffic interruptions at Interurban Road near Wilkinson Road from Dec. 9 to 20

Chilliwack family’s therapy dog injured in hit and run

Miniature pit bull Fifty’s owner is a single mother facing close to $10,000 in vet bills

Cougar destroyed in Penticton area after mauling dog, killing cat

This is the first reported incident with a cougar this year in the Penticton area

Feds not enforcing standards on Hungarian duck imports, B.C. farmer says

‘You have no way of knowing what’s in the bag’

No reports yet of Canadians affected by New Zealand volcano eruption, feds say

Missing and injured included tourists from the U.S., China, Australia, Britain and Malaysia

Vancouver Island blues musician’s mother’s home burglarized and ransacked

David Gogo’s 71-year-old mother has jewelry and artwork stolen in break-in

Dance cancelled after Alberta teacher’s climate lesson prompts online threats

School district near Red Deer cancelled annual family dance due to Facebook comments

In surprise move, defence won’t call witnesses for accused in Abbotsford school killing

‘Change of instructions’ results in defence closing case without calling evidence

B.C. VIEWS: An engine that hums right along

First Nations are leading a new surge of investment in B.C.

Most Read