New online program for military families

  • Jun. 1, 2011 2:00 p.m.

The Esquimalt Military Family Resource Centre will launch the first web-based learning tool for Canadian military parents on Wednesday May 11. Raising Your Military Child  teaches the at-home and deployed parent about the behaviours that they may see in their child and how to support their child at any age. The bilingual training is available online at no cost by visiting www.esquimaltmfrc.com.

“There has been recent research done on the impact of military life on children,” said Gaynor Jackson, executive director of the Esquimalt Military Family Resource Centre.

A study in March 2011 by the University of New Brunswick reported that teens from military families face unique stressors during deployment.

“The study wasn‘t news to Military Family Resource Centres,”  continued Jackson. “We developed Raising Your Military Child because of what our families say their needs are. We have been creating this resource since last fall based on that input. The tool gives parents easily accessible tips on how to best support their children if they are impacted by the lifestyle challenges.  No matter what age, we can all experience stress. This tool covers all age groups from newborns to teens.”

“Nothing like this has really been done in Canada,” said Linda Scott, program manager at the Esquimalt Military Family Resource Centre. “Military parents have a lot of unique challenges,”  said Scott, who helped to develop the product. “They might see changes in the behaviour of their two-year-old during a deployment or in their eight-year-old during a move. If one parent leaves on deployment, the child might not let the other parent out of their sight. If a parent or child is really struggling or if someone has had a tough day, the resource may give the parents a few ideas of things to try.  Maybe the child that was independent is having problems now. Maybe the baby is being shy with the parent who just returned from deployment. The online tool offers specific tips for the at-home parent and for the military member to do while they are away to stay connected with their child.”

It was important to make the learning tool available online.  Research from the Esquimalt Military Family Resource Centre showed that close to 15 percent of military families live outside of a 30-minute drive of one of their three locations.

“Families can’t always get into the resource centre,”  said Jackson. Raising Your Military Child is available for them on our website anytime of the day for them to access confidentially. In some situations, they are a 30 to 45 minute drive from attending a workshop in-person. This way they can access the information at home as their schedules permit.

Established in 1988, the Esquimalt Military Family Resource Centre is the only local non-profit organization that provides programs and services for military members posted to CFB Esquimalt and their families.

Just Posted

LETTERS: It’s time to stop looking for excuses

Re: Proposed fishing restrictions will be devastating: officials I understand how those… Continue reading

Woman trapped under car at University Heights

Driver of sedan backs into older adult walking through lot

Delivery truck downs power lines in Sidney

A tractor trailer delivering eggs clipped a low-hanging wire on Second St.… Continue reading

Stolen West Shore vehicle found in ocean off Oak Bay

SUV was submerged 90 feet from shore at Cattle Point

Sooke soccer team returns home from Paris

A local soccer team has returned home after a 10 day trip… Continue reading

Trudeau asks transport minister to tackle Greyhound’s western pullout

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says he’s asked Transport Minister Marc Garneau to find solutions in Greyhound Canada’s absence.

VIDEO: Life’s a beach at this B.C. sand sculpting contest

More than $50,000 was up for grabs at the annual contest held in Parksville

Group urges Canada to help Holocaust denier on trial in Germany

They’re concerned about Canada’s apparent unwillingness to come to the aid of Monika Schaefer

RCMP seek person of interest after elderly man left with ‘life altering’ injuries

Burnaby RCMP believe a male teen is a ‘person of interest’ in the case

MGM sues Vegas mass shooting victims, argues it isn’t liable

The company argues it has “no liability of any kind” to survivors or families of slain victims

Vancouver police propose policy for victims, witnesses who are undocumented immigrants

If approved, officers will not ask about an immigration status, unless needed

Crashes reach ‘all-time high’ across B.C.: ICBC

Auto insurer recorded more than 350,000 crashes in 2017

Pressure on for ride hailing, bus options in B.C.

Premiers to press Ottawa for help replacing Greyhound service

Saanich Tigers upset Island rivals, win pee wee provincials

The Saanich Tigers overcame Island rivals to complete a playoff run they’ll… Continue reading

Most Read