Oak Bay police make house call to issue speeding ticket

Cops watched motorist speed through school zone, failed to stop for police

A driver thought they got the best of Oak Bay school liaison officer Const. Sandrine Perry Jan. 8.

Perry spotted a BMW speeding in a Glenlyon Norfolk School school zone. The driver turned, as if pulling over, but then left. Despite the speed, Const. Perry was able to note the car’s license plate.

Deputy Chief Ray Bernoties confirmed in an email that Const. Perry went to the driver’s Cook St. residence later and issued a ticket.

“I don’t understand why anyone would speed by kids in a school zone but driving away from police is a whole new level of shameless behaviour,” Dep. Chief Bernoties said.

READ MORE: Oak Bay police see a 10 per cent increase in files for 2018

“This is an issue that I’m working on constantly as it plagues our school zones,” Const. Perry said about speeding. “Sadly, many offenders are parents with school aged children.”

Failing to stop for police nets offenders a $138 fine and three driver penalty points, while speeding in a school zone costs between $196 and $253 plus another three points.

Jesse Laufer [9:37 AM]



jesse.laufer@oakbaynews.com

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