A public demonstration opposing the Kinder Morgan pipeline buyout by the federal government saw people carrying signs protesting various issues, from the pipeline project itself to the Site C dam and others on Thursday evening. After a series of speeches in front of the Visitor’s Information Centre, hundreds of marchers made their way along Wharf Street to Centennial Square, where they met many more participants. Don Descoteau/Victoria News

PIPELINE PROTEST: Trans Mountain project buyout fails to respect First Nations, speakers say

Victoria MP hosting emergency town hall on topic Friday evening at Vic High

Hundreds of people gathered Thursday evening to protest the federal government’s purchase of the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain Pipeline.

Indigenous protesters were central to the proceedings, which began with a series of speeches in front of the Visitor’s Information Centre on Wharf and Government streets, then continued with a march to Centennial Square along Wharf Street. Participants met more demonstrators there.

Cedar George Parker from the Tulalip Tribe near Seattle was among the speakers.

“I really love this day today, cause before, it was as if the First Nations were by themselves,” he said. “But today I look amongst all of you guys and I don’t just see First Nations, I see all different races and colours and that’s the beauty of diversity.”

He and others spoke of the importance of fighting the pipeline project as a way to protect resources such as fresh water and a healthy shellfish and seafood supply for future generations.

A second pipeline related event, an “emergency town hall” on the Kinder Morgan project organized by Victoria NDP MP Murray Rankin, happens Friday from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Due to overwhelming interest and large expected crowds, the venue has been moved to Victoria High School.

Rankin will be joined on the panel by former federal deputy minister Harry Swain and local environmental advocate and former city council candidate Erik Kaye.

editor@vicnews.com

 

A public demonstration opposing the Kinder Morgan pipeline buyout by the federal government saw people carrying signs protesting various issues, from the pipeline project itself to the Site C dam, along with whale-shaped placards supporting the diminishing orca populations on Thursday evening. After a series of speeches in front of the Visitor’s Information Centre, hundreds of marchers made their way along Wharf Street to Centennial Square, where they met many more participants. Don Descoteau/Victoria News

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