A postal worker is helped into an ambulance after being attacked by a dog in the 2400-block of Hamiota Street. (photo Tim Collins)

Postal worker suffers dog attack

Attack occurred as worker was making delivery

A postal worker was making a delivery in the 2400-block of Hamiota Street in Oak Bay Monday when she was attacked by a family dog and suffered bites that necessitated her transport to hospital.

The attack took place at approximately 12:45 p.m. as the postal worker approached the home on July 30.

Police, ambulance and the fire service all responded to the incident and the unidentified worker was treated on site before being transported to hospital by ambulance, leaving the Canada Post van parked in front of the home.

The postal worker was released from the hospital later that day after being treated for a bite wound, confirmed Jeff Woods, acting president for the local Canadian Union of Postal Workers.

RELATED: Dog attacks on mail carriers rise again as online sales boom

A neighbour (who wished to remain anonymous) confirmed that a medium to large sized black mixed breed dog lives at the home in question but said that the dog is always leashed and has, at times, been seen to wear a muzzle.

The neighbour said that there has been no previous issues with the dog who they identified as “Benny”.

For its part, Canada Post has long called for dog owners to take more care in the control of their pets.

Dog bites have increased over the past decade, prompting the corporation to offer special training to their carriers in an attempt to prevent such incidents from occurring.

While Canada Post supplies dog spray to carriers, Woods said that, like bear spray, misfiring can do more harm than good. With most bites occurring when dogs sneak by owners when they open their doors to carriers, Woods recommends closing your dog in a room before answering the door.

There is a three-strike rule in place to deal with repeat offenders. Problem dogs can also be identified and owners warned to keep them leashed at all times. A failure to heed the warning can result in the suspension of mail services.

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