Saanich plans to phase out single use plastic bags following committee review

Saanich plans to stuff plastic bags

Two committees will now review the proposed ban prior to council consideration

Saanich is moving towards banning single-use plastic bags.

“This is an important step,” said Coun. Susan Brice, before council voted to send a bylaw to said effect to two committees for review prior to council consideration. “It is certainly not the end. It is the beginning of a dialogue and an engagement that will have to involve the greater community, because that what [Capital Regional District] staff found has been successful in other cities where there has been broad buy-in and broad engagement from all the stakeholders.”

Saanich’s proposed bylaw which envisions phasing out plastic bags will now go before to the environment and natural areas advisory committee, as well as the planning, transportation and economic development advisory committee for input and public engagement.

Brice — who had tabled a notice a motion last month – said interest in banning single-use plastic bags has been building for many years across the Greater Victoria region thanks to the work of students like Charlotte Brady and Anastasia Castro of Glenlyon Norfolk School who have been pushing for such a ban. In a way, the proposed ban builds on the “exemplary work” of retailers, who have been trying to “wean” the public off this “handy, but environmentally deleterious” product.

Brice’s colleagues praised her efforts in citing the various environmental harm that plastic bags cause.

“This is not draconian,” said Coun. Colin Plant, pointing to various exemptions. “This is a step in the right direction.”

Coun. Fred Haynes praised the proposed ban, but added that he would like to see Saanich go further in eventually eliminating said exemptions. The model bylaw — that will be the basis of Saanich’s bylaw — allows plastic bags for the hygenic storage of bulk items such as fruit, vegetables and nuts, as well as frozen foods, meat or fish.

Historically, merchants used to wrap food in paper, said Haynes. “That’s an appropriate way to go in the future, but we aren’t ready yet,” he said.

The report also fails to address other kinds of plastics. “Eventually, they will come,” he said.

Coun. Dean Murdock and Coun. Judy Brownoff meanwhile predicted that Saanich’s move will send an example for other communities to follow.

The time-frame of Saanich’s move remains uncertain. Plant hoped that Saanich council could approve the ban by end of its term.

Just Posted

Sooke cannabis report does little to answer production questions

Council is trying to get ahead of the issue

Indigenous peoples celebrated at Royal Roads

June 21 event includes host of activities as part of National Indigenous Peoples Day

Sidney Museum donates 60,000 Lego bricks to local schools

Sidney, Deep Cove, ḰELSET, Brentwood, Keating and Cordova Bay elementary schools get Lego avalanche

Peninsula food bank ‘desperate’ for donations

Stock “never been this low” at Saanich Peninsula Lions Food Bank as demand outstrips supplies

Victoria Weekender: What’s happening this weekend, June 15-16

Car Free YYJ, a barber battle and an Outdoor Discovery Day

B.C. VIEWS: When farmland protection doesn’t protect farmers

Secondary residences aren’t mansions, families tell Lana Popham

Bombers down B.C. Lions 33-23 in season opener

Former Lion Andrew Harris leads Winnipeg with 148 rushing yards

Northern B.C. family remembers murdered Indigenous woman with memorial walk

Still no closure for Ramona Wilson’s family 25 years later

Monkey spotted on late-night jaunt in Campbell River

Conservation officers also apparently looking for cougar in the area

B.C. university to offer mentorship program for former youth in care

Students using the provincial tuition waiver program will soon be able to form a community at KPU

Cyclists competing in one of the toughest bike races on the planet pass through Fernie

Divide riders looking strong as they finish first leg of 4160 km race

You might not know these B.C. records are public

Hired a lawyer to file a civil claim? Those are published online

B.C. bus driver loses case to get job back after texting while driving full bus

An arbitator ruled that Tim Wesman’s phone usage was a “a reckless disregard for public safety”

Most Read