Saanich uses a mixture of about 23 per cent salt and 86 per cent water to prep the roads for snow. (District of Saanich/Twitter)

Saanich roads doused in more than 300 tonnes of salt during snowstorm

Crews cleared roads around the clock during the mid-January storm

Saanich spent upwards of 320 tonnes of salt during the recent snowstorm, according to the Saanich Engineering Department.

While residents scrambled to dig their boots and parkas out of storage, District crews were working to take care of the roads 24 hours a day.

The District has 10 vehicles that can be equipped to manage snow and ice when necessary, explained Harley Machielse, director of engineering.

READ ALSO: Speeding Alaska driver tells VicPD police chief he knows how to drive in the snow

Before a snowstorm hits, Saanich crews work to prepare the roads for the impending snow and ice by spreading an anti-icing brine on the surface of the roads. In ideal conditions, the brine – a solution of salt and water – works to keep the roads free of ice for about three days, Machielse said.

The brine was also used to prep the salt for the roads as it often froze in the truck. Wetting the salt helps it activate faster and help it stick to the road, a District spokesperson explained.

Once the snow hit the ground, staff worked around the clock to clear and salt roads on a schedule based on priority, Machielse said. Emergency routes must be cleared within the first 24 hours. Then, crews focus on major routes, important bus routes, steep residential hills, bridges and municipal entrances and parking lots.

READ ALSO: Hazardous black ice coats Greater Victoria streets

Sidewalks, on the other hand, must be cleared by property owners according to Saanich bylaws. Machielse was glad to see residents complying and removing snow from the sidewalks near their homes.

Municipal staff are grateful that residents were patient while routes were cleared, Machielse said. He emphasized that crews worked hard to keep the roads safe during what he hopes will be the last storm of the winter.

As the snow begins to melt, residents are asked to help keep nearby storm drains clear so the water has somewhere to go. Sandbags are available at the public works yard for free.


@devonscarlett
Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

devon.bidal@saanichnews.com

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Sooke, Sidney businesses win top awards during the BC Food and Beverage Awards

Sheringham Distillery won Gold Award for Product of Year while Cascadia Seaweed won Innovation Award

First Nations market fills Colwood’s Royal Beach

Event Wednesday in honour of Orange Shirt Day

West Shore RCMP arrives just in time thanks to tip

Officers remind of resources after mental health call Monday morning

Victoria Humane Society takes revenue hit after donation bins vandalized

Organization removes clothing donation bins after contents removed, scattered

Lamborghini driver slapped with nearly $1,000 in fines while speeding in Central Saanich

Vehicle impounded by Central Saanich police, 11 points issued

No safe mask option for bearded members, RCMP says, but force is exploring solutions

RCMP says respirator not mandatory in all front-line situations, but sometimes needed to reduce risk

Lightning strike: Tampa Bay blanks Dallas 2-0 to win Stanley Cup

Hedman wins Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP

16 MLAs retiring from B.C. politics add up to $20M in pensions: Taxpayers Federation

Taxpayers pay $4 for every dollar MLAs contribute to their pensions

SOOKE HISTORY: Alleged bootlegger has day in court

Blackberry wine confiscated at home

Shawnigan Lake’s Kubica gets 25 to life for murder in California

Former Shawnigan Lake man convicted of killing woman in 1990

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

B.C. VOTES 2020: Echoes of HST in B.C. debate over sales tax

Cannabis, tobacco, luxury cars still taxed in B.C. Liberal plan

She warned her son about toxic drugs, then he was dead

Donna Bridgman’s son died at the age of 38 in Vancouver

Duration of Tour de Rock stop in Chemainus much shorter than usual

Four alumni riders don’t get to come for breakfast in COVID year

Most Read