Saanich student to speak on legislature steps for Pink Shirt Day

Recognize bullying and abusive behaviour early, says teen

Whether she’s teaching her gymnastics students or touring local elementary schools as an anti-bullying ambassador, Grade 12 student Isabell Laughey says kids can be taught a lot earlier than you think.

“Even four year olds can learn about being nicer,” Laughey said. “When kids are mean, they are often mean without even realizing it or meaning to be.”

READ MORE: Lambrick fills the halls with messages of love for Pink Shirt Day

So Laughey wants to remind children to consider how others feel and be kinder. Laughey will speak at the steps of the legislature when Reynolds and other members of the community gather at noon for Pink Shirt Day on Wednesday.

Premier John Horgan, a 1977 Reynolds grad, will speak at 1:15 p.m. with an announcement about education on cyberbullying.

Laughey shared her own elementary and middle school experiences with bullying to a full gymnasium of Reynolds secondary students during the Pink Shirt Day assembly on Tuesday, ahead of keynote speaker Carol Todd. Todd is the mother of Amanda Todd who was cyberbullied and later commited suicide in 2012. Carol spoke about digital responsibility and awareness, but also about coming together as a community and reaching if someone is bullying you. It was a speech that Laughey appreciated.

READ ALSO: Mother of Amanda Todd to speak at Reynolds for Pink Shirt Day

“I was shy and awkward when I was a younger child and I was [particularly] sensitive, and sometimes kids don’t respond well to shyness, they don’t understand it and don’t understand that getting a rise out of someone is hurtful,” Laughey said.

Laughey was finding it hard to make friends in elementary and it became a much worse experience in middle school. Thankfully she’s okay now, and is already giving back in her last year of high school.

“When I look back I think often those who [picked on] me were just trying to be funny and didn’t realize how I felt,” Laughey said.

Pink Shirt Day started as an organic anti-bullying movement by Travis Price and high school pal David Shepherd on a September day in 2007 in Cambridge, N.S.

Price and Shepherd organized a pink shirt protest, purchasing 50 pink shirts and distributing them around the school for classmates to wear in response to a pink-shirt shaming incident the day before.

Price actually spoke at Mount Douglas in 2016 and then at Reynolds in 2017.

reporter@saanichnews.com


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Sooke council backs nuclear weapons ban

Mayor believes the municipality’s role includes global issues

Artificial reef created off East Sooke

Divers are discovering plenty of new sea life

Vaping a growing problem in Sooke school district

Island’s chief medical officer raises the alarm

VicPD cuts its Crime Reduction Unit in response to budget constrictions

The CRU worked to reduce crime in the downtown core

Man hit by vehicle while sitting on a curb near Our Place in Victoria

Emergency crews cleared the scene shortly before 11 a.m.

VIDEO: Clip of driver speeding past B.C. school bus alarms MLA

Laurie Throness of Chilliwack-Kent says he will lobby for better safety measures

Olympic skier from B.C. suing Alpine Canada after coach’s sex offences

Bertrand Charest was convicted in 2017 on 37 charges

B.C. senior’s car vandalized for more than 18 months

Retired RCMP officer determined to catch ‘tagger.’

VIDEO: Driver doing laps in busy Vancouver intersections nets charges

Toyota Camry spotted doing laps in intersection, driving towards pedestrians

Former Canucks goalie Roberto Luongo to retire

‘Bobby Lou’ calls it a career after 19 NHL seasons

An absurd act of religion

Reader says a blessing at Green New Deal town hall was against the spirit of the proceedings

Man charged in crash that killed B.C. pregnant woman

Frank Tessman charged for 2018 Highway 1 accident where Kelowna elementary school teacher died

Province unveils 10-year plan to boost mental health, addiction recovery services

The plan, called A Pathway to Hope, focuses on early-intervention services that are seeing high demand

Most Read