Parents and children who attend the UVic Child Care Services, a program that was under threat but has been marked for $500,000 in provincial funding. Black Press file photo

Parents and children who attend the UVic Child Care Services, a program that was under threat but has been marked for $500,000 in provincial funding. Black Press file photo

UVic, Arbutus add combined 92 child care spots

Province’s announcement brings relief to child care crunch

Relief is on the way for the child care crunch in Gordon Head and Queenswood area of Saanich.

The previously threatened child care program at the University of Victoria is getting $500,000 from the province to build a new facility and will increase its numbers by 32 to 116 for next year.

“The funding will allow us to transform Child Care Complex B into two new child care centres, creating 32 new spaces for preschool aged children of UVic students, faculty and staff families,” said Jim Forbes, director of campus services at UVic.

The announcement came Monday that the province is adding 251 new licensed child-care spaces in Greater Victoria, 172 of which are in Saanich, a $2.7 million investment from the province’s Child Care Major Capital Funding Program. It’s part of a $33-million plan to create more than 3,800 child-care spaces in B.C. More than half of the planned 3,800 new spaces in B.C. are at non-profit run centres and a fifth are at Indigenous child-care providers.

Locally, the funding of $174,381 will add 20 preschool places at the Cloverdale Child Care Society, $387,000 to add 60 spaces at Arbutus Grove Nature Program and Out of School Care, $219,137 to add 20 spaces at Kids Klub Torquay, $218,937 for 20 spaces at Kids Klub Northridge, $200,957 for 20 spaces at Kids Klub Braefoot, $12,400 for 12 spaces at the Curious Kids Infant and Toddler Centre, $250,000 to add 15 spaces at the Victoria Montessori Childcare Centre, $388,548 for 24 spaces at the James Bay Infant Plus Daycare Centre and $371,173 for 28 new spaces at the Phoenix Child Care Centre with the Victoria Immigrant and Refugee Centre Society.

It’s a big addition for Arbutus Grove Children’s Centre, of which 48 of the new spots are out-of-school-care spots for Frank Hobbs elementary students (kindergarten to Grade 5) and 12 are for new nature preschool spots for children three to five.

“It’s 60 new child care spaces that we’re excited about,” said director Lynn Young.

To make room Arbutus is building a new space on Frank Hobbs SD61 land.

Meanwhile construction already started at UVic’s Child Care Complex B in October. The renovations will transform the current large, open, interior space of the 1993-built Complex B into two new child care centres with a shared kitchen and separate exterior entrances.

Around B.C. the province is in the process of working with child-care providers to sign project agreements that include the specific requirements identified for each site, such as property needs (for lease or purchase), local zoning permits and the hiring of contractors to renovate the sites.

“These 251 new spaces are just a start, and we know there’s more work to do,” said Lana Popham, MLA for Saanich South.

The new child-care spaces are part of the B.C. government’s long-term goal of implementing universal child care in B.C.

reporter@saanichnews.com

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