In Saanich, automatic pedestrian walk signals were installed at the majority of traffic signals. (Christine van Reeuwyk/News Staff)

In Saanich, automatic pedestrian walk signals were installed at the majority of traffic signals. (Christine van Reeuwyk/News Staff)

Victoria, Saanich install automated pedestrian crossing signals

No-touch automated crosswalks mitigate spread of COVID-19, improve accessibilty

No-touch crosswalk signals installed across Greater Victoria will help pedestrians avoid surfaces on their outings, says the City of Victoria.

The automated features were added to 25 Victoria intersections near high-activity areas such as grocery stores, pharmacies, parks and recreation areas. Signage can be seen at those crosswalks, indicating that the ‘walk’ signal will come on automatically.

READ ALSO: Do pedestrians know how to cross an intersection?

“Not only does this change help mitigate the spread of COVID-19, it also improves accessibility for those with mobility challenges,” says a statement from Victoria Mayor Lisa Helps.

In Saanich, automatic pedestrian walk signals were installed at the majority of traffic signals, according to Kelsi McLeod, communications manager for the District of Saanich. The sensors were installed at busier areas along Quadra Street, McKenzie Avenue and Shelbourne Street as part of the District’s Active Transportation Plan, a strategy for projects, actions and policies to encourage walking, cycling and transit.

“A sensor detects pedestrians and users no longer need to push the button when crossing,” McLeod told Black Press Media. “We made sure to keep these out of residential neighbourhoods to lessen noise.”

READ ALSO: Saanich rides ahead with Active Transportation Plan



nina.grossman@blackpress.ca

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A number of crosswalks in Victoria, including one at Cook and Oxford Street, are now automated to help limit the number of surfaces pedestrians need to touch. (Nina Grossman/News Staff)

A number of crosswalks in Victoria, including one at Cook and Oxford Street, are now automated to help limit the number of surfaces pedestrians need to touch. (Nina Grossman/News Staff)