Brian Lin, grade 5 student at Rogers Elementary, shows off his game “Mech Survival” at the CodeQuest Arcade event. Nicole Crescenzi/VICTORIA NEWS

WATCH: Designing computer games at age nine

Grade 4/5 students from across SD61 designed games for the Coding Quest Arcade

Laser lights speckled the packed gymnasium at Richmond Elementary School while synthesized computer music played in the background for the Coding Quest Arcade.

Grade 4 and 5 students from across School District 61 lined the tables with poster boards and laptops to show off computer games they had spent the past two months coding into fruition.

Students could design their games any way they liked using a program called “Scratch,” resulting in a variety of different playing styles, themes, and controls.

ALSO READ: SUMMER FUN— Minecraft summer camps enhance STEM skills

One group of students programmed a game where solving math problems would get you music notes so you could bring back music and save the world. Another group created a maze where you had to avoid hitting the walls, while other students tried to bring back a “retro” game.

“All my classmates kept saying ‘You know, bottle flipping is dead,’” said Andrew Makela, grade 5 student at View Royal Elementary School. “I told them ‘yeah, but not for long!’”

Andrew Makela, grade 5, (left) and Brendan Campbell, grade 4 at View Royal Elementary School, show off their video game ” The Ultimate Bottle Flip” at the Coding Quest Arcade. Nicole Crescenzi/VICTORIA NEWS

Makela and his friend Brendan Campbell, grade 4, designed a game called “The Ultimate Bottle Flip” that lets you pick your brand of a pop bottle (accompanied by a pair of sunglasses) and perfect flipping it to land upright.

Pheifer Pemborton and his friend Kieran Smith, both grade 5 students at Rogers Elementary School, made a game called “Slimy Adventures: Lab Edition,” a platform-based game where you try to avoid dangerous chemicals.

Pemborton said his favourite part was learning the code, and Smith said his favourite was designing the backdrops.

“Probably the hardest part was making the platforms,” Smith said. “We made it all from scratch—pun intended!”

RELATED: Thousands of B.C. students, teachers to receive coding classes, digital skill training

Patti Ross is a grade 5 teacher at Rogers Elementary School, and said she was happy her students were learning the program because it also taught them a lot of life skills.

“It’s a great experience, there’s a lot of teamwork that goes into it, problem solving, and working through challenges, ” Ross said. “Sometimes there games don’t work so they have to ask each other for help.”

When asked why learning code was important, students had several reasons.

“Because then you can make fun games, and you can make people happy, and you can make yourself happy by making them,” said Destiny Peltier, grade 5 student at Rogers.

“Maybe like engineering, if you were making computers you’d need to learn code,” said grade 5 Rogers student Marin O’Regan. When asked if she wanted to be a computer engineer, O’Regan shrugged. “Maybe!”

nicole.crescenzi@vicnews.com

codingsd61

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

View Royal fire chief calls for realistic solutions to ‘mess’ at Thetis Lake

Emergency crews harassed while extinguishing brush fire, rescuing drunk 15-year-old during long weekend calls

Greater Victoria woman goes on gratitude mission to thank first responders

Jen Klein fainted while driving and crashed on Pat Bay Highway in 2019

Non-venomous ball python missing in Vic West

Snake was reported missing to Victoria police Tuesday morning

Crews respond to medical incident on West Saanich Road

Incident appears to be cleared, witnesses say

B.C. records 146 new COVID-19 cases through long weekend

More that 28 people tested positive for the virus each day since Friday

Canucks tame Minnesota Wild 4-3 to even NHL qualifying series

J.T. Miller leads Vancouver with goal and an assist

COVID-19 vaccine efforts provide hope but no silver bullet to stop pandemic: Tam

There are more than two dozen vaccines for COVID-19 in clinical trials around the world

Two people die in propane heated outdoor shower near Princeton

Couple was attending a long weekend gathering

Study shines light on what makes LGBTQ+ youth feel safe in a community

The study goes beyond looking at school or family supports

Alberta to require masks at schools this fall, but still no mandate in B.C.

B.C. students are also set to return to classrooms in September

B.C. to allow customers to buy cannabis online for in-store pickup at private shops

Age verification will still be required inside the store

30% of British Columbians would ‘wait and see’ before taking COVID vaccine: poll

Some are concerned about side effects, while others don’t think the virus is a big deal

Most Read