Controversial development will save protected area

Letters

To begin with, we are all on the same page — our beautiful Juan de Fuca Park and trail must be protected by any means.

There are many that think denying this development proposal will save the park and trail from future degradation and damages. I think it will do the opposite and our worst fears of damages will soon be realized.

a) If this development is denied, the seven large upland lots upon which the development is situated will be sold individually to wealthy people who will build a large home with a view on each lot.

b) Extensive clearing, probably to the park boundary may occur to enhance views, as well as other clearing and logging to develop that lot.

c) The lots and park boundary could be fenced which will affect natural animal corridors and could possibly cut off the trail where it trespasses on private lands.

d) Gravel extraction from a developed gravel pit can also be expected.

Our pleasant view of the rain forest from the highway would be significantly altered for the worse.

One way to stop the sale and normal developments of these large lots is to buy them all. However, at the last count, there were no CRD or B.C. government funds available. Besides, I doubt if any government funds would be forthcoming when the owner is wiling to protect the park by 98 hectares of park dedication. He is also willing to protect the rain forest by placing an addition 105 hectares under covenant. This is not an open housing development, it  is a soft environmental footprint with the cabins within the trees at a minimum distance of 150 metres from the trail.

So, once you contemplate the almost certain destruction caused by normal development of these large lots, you may conclude that the best way to protect the park is to allow this development to succeed, with its guaranteed protection.

These issues were crystal clear to the seven member land use commission that voted 5-2 in favour of the application.

G.B. Miller

Shirley

Just Posted

Sixty Sooke homes needed to host Japanese students

Homestay program offers visitors a taste of life in Canada

PHOTOS: Hundreds gather in downtown Victoria for Extinction Rebellion climate protest

The rally is the kickoff to the Global Climate Strike Week of Action

Church bells to ring for 11 minutes in support of Global Climate Strike

Each minute to signify years left to drastically reduce greenhouse gas pollution

Hundreds of foreign species continue to wash along B.C. coast following Japanese tsunami

The Royal BC Museum is home to thousands of samples collected along the west coast of North America

Lone wolf eating seal and howling away on Discovery Island

Fun facts about Takaya the wolf, like his a 36-hour tour around Chatham, Discovery Islands

PHOTOS: Young protesters in B.C. and beyond demand climate change action

Many demonstaers were kids and teens who skipped school to take part

Walmart to quit selling e-cigarettes amid vaping backlash

U.S.’s largest retailer points to ‘growing’ complications in federal, state and local regulations

Former B.C. lifeguard gets house arrest for possession of child porn

Cees Vanderniet of Grand Forks will serve six months of house arrest, then two years’ probation

How to react to Trudeau’s racist photos? With humility, B.C. prof says

‘We are now treating racism as a crime that you cannot recover from’

‘I’d do it again,’ says B.C. man who swam naked, drunk in Toronto shark tank

David Weaver, of Nelson, was drunk when he went to Ripley’s Aquarium in Toronto on Oct. 12 2018

VIDEO: Fire destroys Williams Lake strip club targeted by past arson attempts

Diamonds and Dust Entertainment Lounge destroyed by fire, as well as New World Tea and Coffee House

SOOKE HISTORY: Remembering Sooke’s 1953 soccer team

Elida Peers | Contributed When Milne’s Landing High School opened in 1946,… Continue reading

Trudeau seeks meeting with Singh to apologize for blackface, brownface photos

‘I will be apologizing to him personally as a racialized Canadian,’ Trudeau said Friday

Sixty Sooke homes needed to host Japanese students

Homestay program offers visitors a taste of life in Canada

Most Read