Controversial development will save protected area

Letters

To begin with, we are all on the same page — our beautiful Juan de Fuca Park and trail must be protected by any means.

There are many that think denying this development proposal will save the park and trail from future degradation and damages. I think it will do the opposite and our worst fears of damages will soon be realized.

a) If this development is denied, the seven large upland lots upon which the development is situated will be sold individually to wealthy people who will build a large home with a view on each lot.

b) Extensive clearing, probably to the park boundary may occur to enhance views, as well as other clearing and logging to develop that lot.

c) The lots and park boundary could be fenced which will affect natural animal corridors and could possibly cut off the trail where it trespasses on private lands.

d) Gravel extraction from a developed gravel pit can also be expected.

Our pleasant view of the rain forest from the highway would be significantly altered for the worse.

One way to stop the sale and normal developments of these large lots is to buy them all. However, at the last count, there were no CRD or B.C. government funds available. Besides, I doubt if any government funds would be forthcoming when the owner is wiling to protect the park by 98 hectares of park dedication. He is also willing to protect the rain forest by placing an addition 105 hectares under covenant. This is not an open housing development, it  is a soft environmental footprint with the cabins within the trees at a minimum distance of 150 metres from the trail.

So, once you contemplate the almost certain destruction caused by normal development of these large lots, you may conclude that the best way to protect the park is to allow this development to succeed, with its guaranteed protection.

These issues were crystal clear to the seven member land use commission that voted 5-2 in favour of the application.

G.B. Miller

Shirley

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