Editorial: Council job is not an easy one

Tsunami signs and job of councillors in focus this week

Do we really need tsunami signs in Sooke?

District of Sooke council is considering replacing the tsunami signs which were taken down back in 2007 amidst protests from B&B operators and real estate companies. They were placed in low lying areas around the water, places where waves might arise in the event of a tsunami. The reason for removal back then was public pressure. The reason for putting them back is not from public pressure, but rather public perception of the dangers of a tsunami. Opinions change and the signs remind us where we live.

It would be nice if council would stick to the resolutions they made. Sure, the council is different than back in 2007, but going back and forth on issues creates nothing but the perception that the decisions made in the past were bad ones.

On Monday night, there was an information session for people thinking about running for public office. Apparently there were some new faces in the room. Could it be that we will have new people running for council? That, would be a good thing providing there were a few familiar faces left at the council table. Which ones? The public will decide who stays and who goes. What needs to be remembered is the record of each of the councillors and how they have conducted themselves when serving the citizens of Sooke.

We’re sure the consultant who led the session reminded the hopefuls that their duty is to serve the people of Sooke, to be honest and ethical and to put their own or their “friend’s” interests away. Doing the best for all of Sooke is what a councillor should aim for. It’s not as easy as it seems because favours often need to be repaid and special interest groups need to be remembered. Let’s just have a council that works for all of us and not their own interests – after all that would be a conflict of interest wouldn’t it?

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