EDITORIAL: CRD directors pierce the golden goose

A significant wage increase is underway, but is it right?

Politicians deserve to be fairly compensated. But the way the Capital Regional District went about it – nearly doubling remuneration – was all wrong.

CRD directors voted last week to give themselves a pay hike, increasing the base pay for the board’s 24 members to $17,000 a year from $8,940. The board chairperson will be paid an additional stipend of $25,000 a year, up from $20,000, for a total of $42,000. And let’s remember this doesn’t include additional stipends for committee work.The raises take effect Jan. 1.

The pay hike wouldn’t have been unreasonable, if we got here in small increments. Instead, the CRD held off for 20 years and then decided that taxpayers could handle a 100 per cent increase.

The plan was so badly thought out that some directors weren’t even aware the issue was coming forward until they read about it in local newspapers.

The argument some directors gave was that they were hard done by and have had to make sacrifices to serve the greater constituency. It’s an argument full of holes. To start with, politicians should know what they’re going into before they accept the position. For those on municipal councils, they can always be asked to be relieved of their duties.

The board has now decided an annual cost-of-living adjustments will be applied and remuneration will be reviewed every three to five years to ensure it remains competitive. We suggest they take it another step further and appoint a committee – no politicians, please – who review the pay the year prior to an election. The committee can make a determination on whether politicians are getting fair pay for the work.

Politicians should be put in a position where they think they are making a sacrifice to serve, but they also need to be realistic.

 

Just Posted

Victoria teen killed on field trip near Sooke

Second youth also injured in falling tree incident at Camp Barnard

UPDATE: Firefighters bring Sooke wildfire under control

Firefighters have a wildfire that burned an area about 100x150 feet at… Continue reading

Mix of sun and cloud in Thursday’s forecast

Plus a look ahead at the weekend forecast

Oak Bay double murder trial: Blood splatter analyst says no shoe prints found in unit

RCMP analyst testifies to smears, fingermarks, ‘swipe and wipe’ patterns around apartment

Saanich filmmaker wins award at Indigenous awards in Calgary

Barbara Todd Hager took home the 2019 Inspire Arts Award

VIDEO: ‘Avengers: Endgame’ to be re-released with new footage

‘Avatar’ holds global box office record at $2.788 billion, while ‘Endgame’ stands at $2.743 billion…

Comox Samaritan tucks bear into blanket, gets a big surprise

Conservation officer says person lucky after animal hit by car in record year for bear encounters

Elias Pettersson wins Calder Trophy as NHL’s top rookie

Vancouver forward first Canuck to win award since Pavel Bure in 1992

FVRD chair calls B.C. incineration plan for Philippines waste ‘disturbing’

Metro Vancouver ‘uniquely capable’ of safely disposing of waste coming back to Canada, say officials

VIDEO: Acknowledging skeptics, finance minister vows to build Trans Mountain project

Bill Morneau said he recognizes ‘huge amount of anxiety’ in Calgary over future of oil and gas sector

Shovels could be in the ground on Trans Mountain by September, CEO says

Ian Anderson points to weeks likely required for NEB to reinstate 2016 regulatory record

RCMP allows officers to grow beards

Members can now wear beards and goatees, as long as they’re neatly groomed

Sooke’s new library construction a sad tale

Reader says if the public library project was in the private sector, heads would roll

Girl, 10, poisoned by carbon monoxide at B.C. campsite could soon return home

Lucille Beaurain died and daughter Micaela Walton, 10, was rushed to B.C. Children’s Hospital on May 18

Most Read