Editorial: Helping you get prepared

With the threat of earthquakes and tsunamis, it is time to get informed

There has been some conversation/phone calls about the lack of warning to Sooke residents and those living along the shore about the risk of a potential tsunami.

Sooke is in a location where the threat of damage from a tsunami is not in the extreme. The harbour and basin are relatively safe. While this may not instill a lot of confidence in some people, the fire chief, after the most recent earthquake  did say,  “There was NO warning issued for our area so there was no need to inform people.”

But this raises the bigger question of what can the normal resident do to be prepared for an emergency?

First of all, perhaps Sooke should have some sort of siren which would warn people to; turn on their radio (CFAX or CBC) for any news they should be aware of, or to move to higher ground if you feel some prolonged shaking. It would be impossible for emergency services to knock on every door along the shoreline to tell people to evacuate. But, you can go to this open house.

The Sooke and Juan de Fuca Emergency Programs will be hosting an Emergency Preparedness Open House in Sooke council chambers (2225 Otter Point Road) on Wednesday, Nov. 14 at 7 p.m.  Information on what you and your family should do and be prepared for in the event of a disaster will be available.  Displays and handouts of emergency information on such topics such as earthquakes, tsunamis, wildfires and winter storms will be available. Ready made family emergency kits will be on sale for those people that haven’t put their own together yet.  Information on how you can be an Emergency Program Volunteer will also be provided.

Just Posted

First council candidate is missing

RCMP asks that anyone with information contact them immediately

Junior A hockey coming to Sooke

Exhibition game helps the Rotary Club to help community youth

Life-Altering experience

Six weeks that served to change their view of the world

Camosun mechanical engineering project solve real-world problems

Showcase included projects that confound conventional wisdom, garner industry interest

Declining cellphone charges lead to drop in B.C. inflation rate

Year-to-year inflation in British Columbia stood at 2.1 per cent in July 2019, down 0.5 per cent

Ethnic media aim to help maintain boost in voting by new Canadians

Statistics Canada says new Canadians made up about one-fifth of the voting population in 2016

Sooke’s Old-Fashioned Country Picnic set for Saturday

The free event combines music, kids activities, food and fun

Wife charged in husband’s death in Sechelt

Karin Fischer has been charged with second-degree murder in the death of her husband, Max

B.C. Hydro applies for rare cut in electricity rates next year

Province wrote off $1.1 billion debt to help reverse rate increase

Retired Vancouver Island teacher ‘Set for Life’ after $675K lottery win

Patrick Shannon plans to buy new sails for his sailboat

New police force in Surrey must avoid VPD, RCMP errors made in Pickton case: Oppal

Boots are scheduled to be on the ground by spring 2021

Man at centre of dropped HIV-disclosure case sues province and 10 cops

Brian Carlisle of Abbotsford says Mission RCMP defamed him and were ‘negligent’ in their investigation

Striking Western Forest Products workers could lose benefits in September

Union, forest company at odds over Vancouver Island benefit payments as strike enters third month

Most Read