Editorial: When a community gets caught in strife

Being locked out of schools causes grief for Sooke groups

Strikes affect more people than the employers and the employees. In this case, the teachers’ strike is hurting kids and adults alike. For instance, the usual venue for performances in Sooke is the Edward Milne community theatre. Read – “community” theatre. The theatre is located in the school but it is a community facility. So when the youth choir wanted to perform their musical, the Lion King, they were locked out. When the Sooke Philharmonic Orchestra wanted to perform their Solstice Spectacular they were locked out.

The children in the choir had to rehearse outside and they likely had fewer people attend because of the location. They worked hard to put this on and the extra stress locating it outdoors wasn’t fair to these youngsters or the parents.

The symphony orchestra, something Sooke is really proud of, had to present their concert in the Sooke Community Hall. Maestro Norman Nelson wasn’t too perturbed by the situation, but the seats in the EMCS theatre were much more comfortable and the place more accessible for older music lovers.

The strike situation is impacting more than the teachers, students and government, it is impacting people who just want to go to a musical performance. It is not right. The community theatre is located in a school, yes, but it is a community facility not strictly a school facility. These two groups had booked the space prior to any strike and if agreements can be broken so easily then it is no wonder the two sides are getting nowhere fast.

It’s time to get things worked out and get on with the business of teaching. There has to be some give and take and a hard line approach apparently is not working — on either side.