Letters: An unholy alliance

Letter writer unhappy with Tom Fletcher's apparent bias

ero wage increases, teachers are offered a wage package that ensures their wages will continue to fall behind the cost of living for a decade – all to subsidize ill conceived tax cuts to business by disgraced former premier Gordon Campbell.

The unholy alliance between corporate power and BC Liberal politicians keeps the Liberals in power thanks to corporate campaign contributions in return for government generosity paid by tax dollars. Witness the reciprocal favours between our government and Western Forest Products, Telus, the fish farm industry and Postmedia  to name only a few. The result is a depleted public treasury, shredded social programs, burdened schools, hospitals, seniors, handicapped and the poor. That’s how it works in this province, government diverts money to business and business kicks back money to keep the Liberals in power.

Teacher wage goals are fair and teachers should be admired for taking a stand to protect their standard of living and the quality of education in our classrooms.

Five years of costly university with a possible student loan debt of $40,000-$50,000 to start at the bottom of a 10-year ladder to get to full pay is a long 15-year apprenticeship unheard of in most occupations.

Conservative shills like Fletcher promote a race to the bottom economy where unionized people are scorned for wanting decent wages and benefits – if the private sector doesn’t have it, why should unions? Fletcher needs to review his history lessons that show we would not have a middle class and the general quality of wages and benefits that Canadians enjoy were it not for the sacrifices of unionized and non-unionized workers despite entrenched resistance from “Our” government and business. Historically union wages and benefits have helped private sector wages and benefits.

Right wing politicians are running public education into the ground here, in the U.S.A., the U.K., Australia and elsewhere. If teachers can stand strong against the overwhelming odds of this corporate/political menace not only will our children benefit from decent schools, their efforts might help stem the tide of the politically sponsored attack on a decent standard of living Canadians want and deserve. Fletcher’s predictable bias does nothing to help B.C. in general and B.C. school kids in particular.

Ted Roberts

Sook

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

This photo of Cheryl-Lynn Townsin and her daughter, Lexi, is part of Townsin’s documentary, RARE HUMANS - Turning Hope into Action, her capstone project for her graduate degree from Royal Roads University. (Photo courtesy of Cheryl-Lynn Townsin)
Greater Victoria mother’s grief fuels documentary of ‘Turning Hope into Action’

Lexi, 6, died in 2019 from Blau Syndrome and is among the children documented

A survey by Statistics Canada finds Black Canadians earn less than non-visible minority Canadians despite having higher levels of education. (The Canadian Press file photo)
COVID-19 worsened unemployment picture for Black Canadians

Black Canadians also more likely to suffer other hardships

This dead fir tree is one of many in Mount Douglas Park. Nine dead trees will be removed from the Douglas Creek site starting March 8 to make way for the construction of a new pedestrian bridge. (Photo courtesy Jason Clarke)
Nine dead, hazardous trees to be removed from Saanich park ahead of bridge construction

Felling begins March 8, minor trail interruptions expected in Mount Douglas Park

Activists from the Fairy Creek Blockades hold the injunction application notice which was submitted by logging company Teal Jones to the B.C. Supreme Court. The application, which asks to have blockaders removed from the sites that stop access to cut blocks, is set to be heard on March 4. (Photo contributed/Joshua Wright)
Activists hunker down to protect Fairy Creek near Port Renfrew from logging

Forest company Teal Cedar applies for injunction to remove seven-month-old blockades

The application proposing to rezone Western Speedway was passed by Langford’s planning, zoning and affordable housing committee Feb 8. A petition has since been started by residents of Trudie Terrace, hoping to stop the proposed residential portion of the development plan. (CBRE Victoria)
Petition opposing Western Speedway development proposal gains steam

Save Thetis Heights Neighborhood petition aims to stop extension of Trudie Terrace

Older rental apartments are prime candidates for renovations, and could result in lost affordable housing stock. (Zoë Ducklow photo)
B.C.’s renoviction overhaul a good start, but won’t preserve affordable stock, lawyer says

And still no protection for people who can’t pay rent due to COVID-19

(Photo by Marissa Baecker/Shoot the Breeze)
B.C. WHL teams to hit the ice with Kelowna, Kamloops hub cities

Kelowna, Kamloops centres chosen to host B.C. WHL teams for 24-game regular season

.
LETTER: Anti-semitism definition lacking

Re: We must identify anti-Semitism and combat it (Online, Feb. 26) I… Continue reading

The victim of the homicide on Cowichan Lake Road early Monday morning was 17 years old, and was stabbed in the incident. (File photo)
Duncan homicide victim was 17 years old

RCMP report that teenager was stabbed

(File photo)
RCMP arrest man after report of gun-toting threat-maker near Parksville schools

43-year-old man taken into custody; students at nearby schools were asked to stay inside

The machines are akin to ATMs and allow drug users at risk of overdose to get hydromorphone pills dispensed to them after their palm has been scanned to identify its unique vein pattern. (CANADIAN PRESS)
Feds dole out $3.5M for ‘vending machines’ to dispense safer opioids in B.C.

The machines are located in four cities across Canada, including Vancouver and Victoria

Kelowna’s lakefront visitor centre is one of 130 around the province. Tourism businesses have been hardest hit by COVID-19 restrictions on travel. (Destination B.C.)
Tourism, small business getting COVID-19 help, B.C. minister says

$300M grant program has delivered $50 million so far

Most Read