Letters: Cheap shots from Fletcher

Letter writer takes aim at Tom Fletcher's editorial

Desperate for some mud to sling at the BCTF, Tom Fletcher seizes on the cheapest shot available.

Yes, one misguided teacher had her Grade 1 students write the education ministry. Dumb move all (herself and her colleagues) agree.Fletcher cites further evidence of this “self-serving abuse” by teachers  in how students skipped classes to support teachers presumably under the mind-control of the teachers. How Tom could know this is perplexing. I guess Tom had access to hidden microphones in the classrooms to document the students being brainwashed.

Funny, when public radio interviewed demonstating students they invariably said their teachers avoided giving opinions on the strike.

Tom, your comments were an insult to these young people. They can think for themselves and to write them off as union puppets is a low blow. According to Tom, generations of indoctrination have fooled people into believing government underfunding is the problem. I thought the problem was things like no sports equipment or photocopier paper.

Incredibly, Tom tells us that class size doesn’t matter. The last time I heard  that ill-informed position it was from the education minister of the day as she justified more funding cuts (she’s premier now).  Whew! I guess those private schools that tout small class sizes and individual learning don’t know what Tom knows.

Anyone who is actually paying attention and follows the legislature knows by now schools, hospitals and other services are being deliberately underfunded to create crises to justify privatization. It’s the universal conservative agenda.

I retired early with a reduced pension – too many desks/students in my Math 10 class. I literally could not walk down the aisle between the desks, too many hands up I couldn’t help those who wanted to learn but needed a little more help.

To see too many get discouraged and give up on the course and  on themselves was too disheartening. Maybe some could afford to send their kids to a private school – better class sizes there.

Ted Roberts

Sooke

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