Letters: Energy protection policies needed

Protectionist energy policies required to serve local communities

Tom Fletcher  (“Goodbye greenhouse gas goals,” June 20, 2012) answers the rhetorical question ‘are B.C.’s greenhouse gas reduction targets history?’ in the affirmative, and that is good news for all people in this Pacifican province.

Relying on ‘a new draft plan from BC Hydro on how to meet future power demand,’ he reports that electricity demand could rise by 50 per cent over the next 20 years.

We are so blessed by abundant natural resources with hydro-electric potential that there should never be any need to import anything at all to supply this growing demand.

We need protectionist energy policies that serve the needs of people here first.

In fact, however, the Christy Clark government has plans to ‘buy gas-fired power from outside the province’ to service ‘domestic industrial and residential demand’, and ‘for export,’ according to Mr. Fletcher.

Amazingly, this same government also allows the importation of dangerous nuclear-powered energy from south of the border.

Mr. Fletcher concludes that the ‘B.C. government has little choice but to redefine its climate targets.’

I have a better idea: why not cancel all so-called ‘sustainable’ policies based on the UN’s Agenda 21 junk science of ‘anthropogenic climate change’ nonsense altogether?

Rescind the phoney carbon tax, which clearly has never had any ameliorating effect on the environment, and never will.

If any government has concerns about climate, it would do well to ban geo-engineering, commonly called ‘chemtrails’.

Surely we can all agree that geo-engineering is where we can discern real detrimental effects, with people losing vitamin D from reduced solar radiation, with consequent mental and physical disorders aggravated by the dark cloudy skies, the direct result of these misguided attempts to cool the planet by dumping aluminum, barium, sodium and other light reflecting particulate matter through aerosol spraying from jets criss-crossing our skies.

Gregory Hartnell

Victoria

 

 

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